The Founding of Harvard College

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Harvard University Press, 1935 - Education - 472 pages
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Morison here traces the roots of American universities in Europe, as they have perhaps never been traced before; and with mellow erudition, frequent flashes of wit, and a lively contemporary perspective, he sketches in a realistic picture of the founding of the first American university north of the Rio Grande.
  

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Contents

THE MEDIEVAL UNIVERSITY AT WORK AND PLAY
18
CAMBRIDGE THE RENAISSANCE AND THE PURITANS
40
THE ARTS COURSE 16001640
60
TRINITY
79
EMMANUEL COLLEGE AND JOHN HARVARD 15841635
92
OTHER FOUNDERS AND THEIR COLLEGES
108
THE UNIVERSITIES OF OXFORD AND OF DUBLIN
117
THE SCOTTISH UNIVERSITIES 15741640
126
JOHN HARVARD
210
A SCHOOL OF TYRANNUS 16381639
228
DUNSTER TAKES HOLD
241
A PRITY LIBRARY BEGUNE
263
THE OLD COLLEGE
271
THE QUEST FOR REVENUE 16401650
292
GOVERNMENT BY PRESIDENT AND OVERSEERS
325
A THE STUDENT UNIVERSITIES OF BOLOGNA SPAIN
353

THE FOUNDING OF NEW ENGLAND
148
THE FOUNDING OF HARVARD COLLEGE
161
Dux FEMINA FACTI
171
THE COLLEDG is ORDERED TO BEE AT NEWETOWNE
181
THE COLLEGE OPENED 16371638
193
ENGLAND BEFORE 1646
359
OF MEXICO?
411
E DUNSTERS MEMORANDUM OF DECEMBER 1653
448
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About the author (1935)

Samuel Eliot Morison was born in Boston in 1887. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1912 and began teaching history there in 1915, becoming full professor in 1925 and Jonathan Trumbull professor of American history in 1941. He served as the university's official historian and wrote a three-volume history of the institution, the Tercentennial History of Harvard College and University, which was completed in 1936. Between 1922 and 1925 he was Harmsworth professor of American history at Oxford. He also was an accomplished sailor who retired from the navy in 1951 as a rear admiral. In preparing for his Pulitzer Prize-winning biographies of Christopher Columbus and John Paul Jones, Admiral of the Ocean Sea (1941) and John Paul Jones: A Sailor's Biography (1952) he took himself out of the study and onto the high seas, where he traced the voyages of his subjects and "lived" their stories insofar as possible. When it came time for the U.S. Navy to select an author to write a history of its operations in World War II, Morison was the natural choice for the task. In 1942, Morison was commissioned by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to write a history of U.S. naval operations in World War II and given the rank of lieutenant commander. The 15 volumes of his History of United States Naval Operations in World War II appeared between 1947 and 1962. Although he retired from Harvard in 1955, Morison continued his research and writing. A product of the Brahmin tradition, Morison wrote about Bostonians and other New Englanders and about life in early Massachusetts. He was an "American historian" in the fullest sense of the term. He also had a keen appreciation for the larger history of the nation and world, provincial is the last word one would use to describe Morison's writing.

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