Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787

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W. W. Norton & Company, 1987 - History - 695 pages
4 Reviews
Shares President Madison's account of the debates that shaped the Constitutional Convention as well as the U.S. Constitution.
  

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Review: Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787 Reported by James Madison

User Review  - Brandon - Goodreads

This is a great first hand account of the convention. Read full review

Review: Notes of Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787 Reported by James Madison

User Review  - Mike Anderson - Goodreads

Madison's telling of the American Constitutional convention. The essential first hand account. Read full review

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About the author (1987)

James Madison, the fourth president of the United States, was born at Port Conway, Virginia. He was raised on a large family farm, called Montpelier, which remained his home throughout his life. After receiving a boarding school education, he entered the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), from which he graduated in 1771. In 1776, Madison was elected a delegate to the Virginia Revolutionary Convention, where he was a strong advocate of religious freedom. He then became a Virginia legislator. As delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, he became the chief architect of the U.S. Constitution and, later, of the Bill of Rights. Madison served in the first Congress from 1789 to 1797, rising to the position of Speaker of the House. In 1801, he became Secretary of State in the administration of Thomas Jefferson, and in 1809, he was elected president. Madison's insights on the nature of politics and the operations of government are as relevant today as they were in his time. His journals provide our principal source of knowledge about the Constitutional Convention of 1787. He also shared the authorship of "The Federalist Papers" (1787-88), arguably the most significant American contribution to political theory, with Alexander Hamilton and John Jay. His insights into political behavior (such as Federalist paper number 10 on the subject of factions) and the nature of government (Federalist papers numbers 39 and 51 on the allocation of power) continue to be useful for those who seek to write constitutions for new governments today.

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