The Cox Family in America: A History and Genealogy of the Older Branches of the Family from the Appearance of Its First Representative in this Country in 1610 (Google eBook)

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publisher not identified, 1912 - 669 pages
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This book opened a new world to me! I knew the families around my direct line, but had no way of researching the details past the census records. I have spent days recording what the Cox family in 1912 was able to assemble.
I cannot thank you enough.
I with there was a way to make the pages match the index, and make them accessible without going through page by page. What a pain!
Worth it, though.
Finally, I discovered it is two books--one on Coxes in general--from everywhere, and a separate accounting of the Coxes on Long Island, in which I am specifially interested. They are numbered separately, and require patience in reading the NEHGS format where the #'s are in bold after the listing in the family.
Thank you.
 

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Page 282 - ... as long as he does not disturb others or oppose the government. This maxim of moderation has always been the guide of the magistrates of this city, and the consequence has been that from every land people have flocked to this asylum. Tread thus in their steps, and we doubt not you will be blessed.
Page 282 - ... proceedings against them ought not to be discontinued, except you intend to check and destroy your population ; which, however, in the youth of your existence ought rather to be encouraged by all possible means : Wherefore, it is our opinion, that some connivance would be useful ; that the consciences of men, at least, ought ever to remain free and unshackled.
Page 282 - For which of you being taken from your wife and family, without just cause, would be bound from returning to them unless upon terms to act contrary to your conscience, and deny your faith and religion, yet this In effect do you require of me and not less. But truly, I cannot think that you did In sober earnest ever think I would subscribe to any such thing, it being the very thing for which I rather chose freely to suffer want of the company of my dear wife and children, imprisonment of my person,...
Page 284 - ... loss of reason." In the month of October, 1647, we find him In Boston, on the point of setting sail for England. What was the occasion or object of this journey is not apparent. That it was necessary, perhaps compulsory, may be Inferred from some expressions in a letter which he at that time wrote...
Page 282 - Friends, the paper drawn up for me to subscribe I have perused and weighed, and do find the same not according to that engagement to me through one of your members, viz : that he or you would do therein by me as you would be done unto, and not otherwise. For which of you being taken from your wife and family, without just cause, would be bound from returning to them unless upon terms to act contrary to your conscience, and deny your faith and religion, yet this In effect do you require of me and...
Page 282 - Bowne, and, although it is our cordial desire that similar and other sectarians might not be found there, yet, as the contrary seems to be the case, we doubt very much if rigorous proceedings against them ought not to be discontinued, except you intend to check and destroy your population, which however, in the youth of your existence, ought rather to be encouraged by all possible means.
Page 296 - December shall be reckoned, taken, deemed and accounted to be the first Day of the Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fifty-two...
Page 280 - Bowne by those present — boete — 5 and 20 pounds Flemish with the charges of the Justician, and with express admonition and interdict to abstain from all such forementioned meetings and conventicles, or else for the second boete he be condemned in a double boete, and for the third boete to be banished out of this province of New Netherlands.
Page 72 - Territory and was continuously reelected as Justice of the Peace and Judge of the Court of Common Pleas.
Page 282 - Honorable, Right Respectable Gentlemen. We omitted in our general letter the trouble and difficulties which we and many of our good inhabitants have since sometimes met with, and daily are renewed by the sect called Quakers, chiefly in the county and principally in the English villages, establishing forbidden conventicles and frequenting those against our published placards, and disturbing in a manner the public peace, in so far that several of our magistrates and...

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