Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and Civilization

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, 1972 - Art - 248 pages
4 Reviews

This book interprets for the Western mind the key motifs of India's legend, myth, and folklore, taken directly from the Sanskrit, and illustrated with seventy plates of Indian art. It is primarily an introduction to image-thinking and picture-reading in Indian art and thought, and it seeks to make the profound Hindu and Buddhist intuitions of the riddles of life and death recognizable not merely as Oriental but as universal elements.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and Civilization

User Review  - Walter - Goodreads

Joseph Cambell's teacher! Amazing tales and commentary. Read full review

Review: Myths and Symbols in Indian Art and Civilization

User Review  - Chaney Bicknell - Goodreads

So far the take on Indian myth (from a person with a thoroughly Western background and perspective) is interesting and valuable. Indian myth is a weak area in my knowledge of world myth as a whole ... Read full review

Contents

II
3
III
11
IV
19
VI
23
VII
27
VIII
35
X
53
XI
59
XIX
123
XX
130
XXI
137
XXII
148
XXIII
151
XXV
175
XXVI
185
XXVII
189

XII
69
XIII
72
XV
77
XVI
90
XVII
102
XVIII
109
XXVIII
197
XXIX
217
XXX
223
XXXI
249
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1972)

Joseph Campbell was born in White Plains, New York on March 26, 1904. He received a B.A. in English literature in 1925 and an M.A. in Medieval literature in 1927 from Columbia University. He was awarded a Proudfit Traveling Fellowship to continue his studies at the University of Paris. After he had received and rejected an offer to teach at his high school alma mater, his Fellowship was renewed, and he traveled to Germany to resume his studies at the University of Munich. During the year he was housemaster of Canterbury School, he sold his first short story, Strictly Platonic, to Liberty magazine. In 1934, he accepted a position in the literature department at Sarah Lawrence College, a post he would retain until retiring in 1972. During his lifetime, he wrote more than 40 books including The Hero with a Thousand Faces, The Mythic Image, the four-volume The Masks of God, and The Power of Myth with Bill Moyers. During the 1940s and 1950s, he collaborated with Swami Nikhilananda on translations of the Upanishads and The Gospel of Sri Ramakrishna. He received several awards including National Institute of Arts and Letters Award for Contributions to Creative Literature and the 1985 National Arts Club Gold Medal of Honor in Literature. He died after a brief struggle with cancer on October 30, 1987.

Bibliographic information