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A fine book, and one that is particularly useful as a counterpoint to the ersatz "inspirational calendar" quotes attributed to Mother Teresa circulating in the Web with great frequency. In the same way that even a blind squirrel will find a nut, even a blinkered, dogmatic zealot might do some good in this world. (And, with reference to another reviewer, the opinion of anyone who cites a bigot such as William A. Donohue is automatically disqualified from the conversation.)  

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Hitchens briefly, callously and comprehensively eviscerates Theresa in this short little book. He brutally treats her in the exact way you would expect of an atheist disarticulating a believer. Normally this is a weak position to take since the two worlds so rarely intersect, but given the real-world implications of Theresa’s ministry – taking millions of donations, using none of it for the palliations or treatment of the dying Indians in her care, and allowing herself to be ruthlessly and absurdly used by dictators and monsters for the purposes of public relations – it is not only warranted, but necessary. The book is eye-opening and a handy little answer to everyone who has ever used Theresa as a icon of compassion. The book also exposes what should be horrific for believers as well – the forcible conversion of the dying to Catholicism through unwanted, secretive baptism. The spiritual equivalent of rape. 

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Even some of Hitchens' fellow leftists have noticed his deep-seated hatred of Catholicism. In the 1980s, Robert Orsi accused Hitchens of continuing "a shameful Nation tradition of anti-Catholicism," adding that "Hitchens's straightforward hatred of Catholics is offensive and ugly prejudice." It is to be expected, then, that anyone as well received as Mother Teresa would be too much for Hitchens to bear.
Hating Mother Teresa
By William A. Donohue
(from Catalyst, March 1996)
Mother Teresa has "deceived" us. Her work with the poor is done not for its own sake, but to "propagandize one highly subjective view of human nature." She is "a religious fundamentalist, a political operative, a primitive sermonizer and accomplice of worldly secular powers." Furthermore, the Albanian nun is "a demagogue, an obscurantist and a servant of earthly powers." She keeps company with "frauds, crooks and exploiters," and takes in millions of unaccounted for dollars.
If this sounds like nonsense, well, it is. But it is also the way Christopher Hitchens looks at Mother Teresa. His book, The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice, is a sequel to his British television "documentary" entitled "Hell's Angel." The sexual message implied in the book's title demonstrates that Hitchens never escaped adolescence, and both the book and the film are designed to get the public to hate Mother Teresa the way he does. That he hasn't fooled even the Village Voice, which took note of Hitchens' hidden agenda "to prove all religion equally false," must be disconcerting for the author. After all, if the alienated can't be fooled, it's time for Hitchens to pack it in.
Christopher Hitchens is a British transplant, a political pundit who has written a column for the Nation magazine for decades. The Nation, for the unacquainted, is a magazine that would put a smile on the face of Joseph Stalin. (Speaking of Stalin, it is not unimportant that Hitchens' father was a gunrunner for Old Joe, proving once again the maxim "the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.") Hitchens has also written many books, none of them of any consequence, and has now found a new home writing for Vanity Fair. Having spent his entire adult life on the wrong side of history, he has become a very bitter and angry man.
Why does Hitchens hate Mother Teresa? Like Mother Teresa, Hitchens is troubled by poverty. Unlike her, he does nothing about it. What upsets him most is that the world's greatest champion of the dispossessed is an unassuming nun. Hitchens would prefer to grant the award to ideology, namely to the politics of socialism. And because he is a determined atheist, he cannot come to terms with Mother Teresa's spirituality and the millions who adore her. More than this, it is her Catholicism that drives him mad.
Even some of Hitchens' fellow leftists have noticed his deep-seated hatred of Catholicism. In the 1980s, Robert Orsi accused Hitchens of continuing "a shameful Nation tradition of anti-Catholicism," adding that "Hitchens's straightforward hatred of Catholics is offensive and ugly prejudice." It is to be expected, then, that anyone as well received as Mother Teresa would be too much for Hitchens to bear.
As expected, Mother Teresa has won scores of awards from all over the world. This bothers Hitchens. What has she done with the money earned from the awards? He doesn't know, but that doesn't stop him from saying "nobody has ever asked what became of the funds." Not true. He has asked, so why doesn't he tell us what he found? Because that would take work. Worse than that, he would then have to confront the truth. This is why he would rather imply that Mother Teresa is sticking the loot in her pocket. It's easier this way.
His book, by the way, is a 98 page essay printed on eight-and-a-half by five-and-a-half inch paper, one that is
 

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excellent book, See also the Time mag issue 13 sept 2007. Chris is a probing author. well done.

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