Debating the presidency: conflicting perspectives on the American executive

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CQ Press, Jan 31, 2006 - Biography & Autobiography - 222 pages
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Each pro and con essay--written in the form of a debate resolution--offers a compelling yet concise view on the most pivotal issues facing the modern presidency: whether the framers of the Constitution would approve of the modern presidency, the media scrutinize the president too much, or the president is a better representative of the people than Congress. Ellis and Nelson introduce each pair of pro/con essays, giving students context and preparing them to read each argument critically, so they can decide for themselves which side of the debate they find most persuasive.

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Contents

Resolved the framers of the Constitution
1
Resolved political parties should nominate candidates
14
Resolved the president should be elected
30
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Richard J. Ellis is the Mark O. Hatfield Professor of PolitiRichard J. Ellis is the Mark O. Hatfield Professor of PolitiRichard J. Ellis is the Mark O. Hatfield Professor of Politics at Willamette University, and the author of numerous bookcs at Willamette University, and the author of numerous bookcs at Willamette University, and the author of numerous books on the presidency including, "Presidential Travel: The Jous on the presidency including, "Presidential Travel: The Jous on the presidency including, "Presidential Travel: The Journey from George Washington to George W. Bush" and "Foundingrney from George Washington to George W. Bush" and "Foundingrney from George Washington to George W. Bush" and "Founding the American Presidency". the American Presidency". the American Presidency".

Nelson is a professor of Political Science at Rhodes College.