When Nature's Not Enough: Personal Journeys Through in Vitro Fertilization

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Globe Pequot, Jan 1, 2005 - Family & Relationships - 247 pages
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More than two million married couples in the United States are diagnosed with infertility. For many of them, in vitro fertilization is their only chance to have a biological child. It's a subject that hasn't exactly joined the ranks of cocktail party conversation. For the majority of the men and women who dive headfirst into IVF, the emotional ramifications are theirs alone to navigate. Until now. Journalist Diana Olick faced equal parts shame and fear when her OB/GYN "fired" her

and her husband after their failed attempts to get pregnant. She scanned bookstore shelves to find a story that reflected her own, wanting to know how other men and women approached infertility and IVF. That book didn't exist, so Diana decided to write it. She narrates eloquently and honestly her experiences and conducts in-depth interviews with other couples to get the story from every angle, exploring such questions as: .

Is it a sign that we shouldn't be pregnant if it can't happen naturally? .
How difficult is the IVF drug regimen? .
Should we tell our relatives? Friends? Employers? .
How many fertilized embryos should we put back in? .
What if it doesn't work? Is it worse to try and fail? .
Are there any ongoing health ramifications for mother and/or child?

WHEN NATURE'S NOT ENOUGH is not a medical resource, but the first book to chronicle the emotional journeys of couples who undergo IVF. It's a book that belongs on the shelves of infertile couples--and all who care about them.
  

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Contents

Infertility
5
Taking the Leap
35
Choosing Your Maker
49
Paying the Price
57
Tbe Drugs
67
Married to IVF
77
Your Secret
87
Retrieval and Transfer
105
Try Try Again
135
No
143
Thirtytwo Weeks and Two Days
157
Normal
181
Normal
191
Aftereffects
205
Looking Back
223
Copyright

Ifc
119

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About the author (2005)

DIANA M. OLICK has been a broadcast journalist for over a decade, first with CBS News and now as Capitol Hill Correspondent for CNBC. She lives in Washington, D.C., with her husband and their twins, who were conceived through in vitro fertilization. She decided to write this book after her OB/GYN "fired" her and her husband after their failed attempts to get pregnant.

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