The reviewer reviewed: or, An answer to strictures contained in the Princeton Biblical repertory, for July, 1840, on Dr. Hill's History of the rise, progress, genius, and character, of American Presbyterianism. ... (Google eBook)

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Printed for the author, 1842 - 27 pages
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Page 3 - He that is first in his own cause seemeth just; but his neighbour cometh and searcheth him.
Page 3 - That thou shouldest take it to the bound thereof, And that thou shouldest know the paths to the house thereof? Knowest thou it, because thou wast then born? Or because the number of thy days is great?
Page 7 - ... poison should diffuse itself insensibly, and bring in a world of disorders and confusions upon us, all the provinces are therefore enjoined, but more especially those which border on the sea, to be exceedingly careful that this evil do not get footing in the churches of this kingdom," &c. &c. p. 467. There are many acts of these synods which would make modern ears tingle, and which prove that American Presbyterianism in its strictest form, was a sucking dove compared to that of the immediate...
Page 7 - ... colloquies or synods, in matters of discipline or order; and that they settle their dwellings in this kingdom; a thing of great and dangerous consequence if not in time carefully prevented. Now this Assembly fearing lest the contagion of this poison should diffuse itself insensibly, and bring in a world of disorders and confusions upon us...
Page 12 - ... that every particular church should of right be governed by its own laws without any dependency or subordination unto any person whatsoever in ecclesiastical matters; and without being obliged to own or acknowledge the authority of...
Page 7 - Synod, 1644 5, it was reported "by certain deputies of the maritime provinces, that there do arrive unto them from other countries, some persons going by the name of Independents, and so called, for that they teach every particular church should of right be governed by its own laws, without any dependency or subordination unto any person whatsoever in ecclesiastical matters, and without being obliged to own or...
Page 18 - M'Nish, but that he declined, and in 1713 Mr. Magill was received as an ordained minister, as will be seen from the following extract. " Mr. Robert Lawson, Mr. Daniel Magill, and Mr George Gillespie, having applied to this presbytery for admittance as members thereof, the presbytery finding, by their ample testimonials, that they have been legally and orderly ordained as ministers of the gospel, and that they have since behaved themselves as such, did cheerfully and cordially receive them, and they...
Page 12 - So true it is, that violent measures in religion weaken the church that employs them. Lewis XIV. was only in the fifth year of his age at the demise of his father. The queen-mother was appointed sole regent during his minority, and cardinal Mazarine, a creature of Richlieu's, was ber prime minister. The edict of Nantz was confirmed, 1643, by the regent, and again by the king at his majority, 1652.
Page 17 - Patux'ent; hence it was ordered that Mr. "Wilson do supply the, people of Patuxent four Sabbaths ; Mr. Henry four Sabbaths, and Mr. Hampton is left to himself to supply sometimes if he can.
Page 17 - He was received by the presbytery as a licentiate in 1715, as appears from the following record. " Mr. James Gordon having presented a call from the people of Baltimore county, in Maryland, unto Mr. Hugh Conn, the presbytery called for, considered and approved the said Mr. Conn's credentials as a preacher of the gospel, and likewise considered and approved the call, which being presented by the moderator unto Mr.

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