Solitude (Google eBook)

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Cropper & Brown, 1856 - Solitude - 360 pages
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Page 282 - In time some particular train of ideas fixes the attention; all other intellectual gratifications are rejected; the mind, in weariness or leisure, recurs constantly to the favourite conception, and feasts on the luscious falsehood whenever she is offended with the bitterness of truth. By degrees the reign of fancy is confirmed; she grows first imperious, and in time despotic. Then fictions begin to operate as realities, false opinions fasten upon the mind, and life passes in dreams of rapture or...
Page 298 - The powers of man : we feel within ourselves His energy divine : he tells the heart, He meant, he made us to behold and love What he beholds and loves, the general orb Of life and being : to be great like him, Beneficent and active.
Page 128 - Oh ! he will tell thee, that the wealth of worlds Should ne'er seduce his bosom to forego That sacred hour...
Page 93 - How various his employments, whom the world Calls idle ; and who justly, in return, Esteems that busy world an idler too ! Friends, books, a garden, and perhaps his pen, Delightful industry...
Page 247 - In all the dewy landscapes of the Spring, In the bright eye of Hesper, or the morn, In Nature's fairest forms, is aught so fair As virtuous friendship ? as the candid blush Of him who strives with fortune to be just ? The graceful tear that streams for others...
Page 297 - Fresh pleasure only : for the attentive mind, By this harmonious action on her powers, Becomes herself harmonious : wont so oft In outward things to meditate the charm Of sacred order, soon she seeks at home To find a kindred order, to exert Within herself this elegance of love, This fair inspir'd delight : her temper'd powers Refine at length, and every passion wears A chaster, milder, more attractive mien.
Page 261 - The tear forgot as soon as shed, The sunshine of the breast: Theirs buxom health, of rosy hue, Wild wit, invention ever new, And lively cheer, of vigour born, The thoughtless day, the easy night, The spirits pure, the slumbers light That fly th
Page 22 - O sacred solitude ! divine retreat ! Choice of the Prudent ! envy of the Great ! By thy pure stream, or in thy waving shade, We court fair wisdom, that celestial maid : The genuine offspring of her lov'd embrace, (Strangers on earth !) are innocence and peace : There, from the ways of men laid safe ashore, We smile to hear the distant tempest roar...
Page 352 - Here love his golden shafts employs, here lights His constant lamp, and waves his purple wings, Reigns here and revels...
Page 112 - HAPPY the man, whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air, In his own ground. Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire ; Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter fire.

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