The Politics of Work: Gender and Labour in Victoria, 1880-1939

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 23, 1993 - History - 267 pages
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The Politics of Work is concerned with the complex relationship between economic and technological change, the nature of sexual division in the workforce, and the role of union, employer and state activists. It carefully traces the impact of all of these factors on wage levels for men and women. The treatment of these themes touches on wide historical issues, as we follow the fortunes of Victorian manufacturing and consider the political strategies of the trade unions of the time and the state's response to them. The study is also an important piece of social history, evoking the nature of work for many Australians of the period.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Before the Wages Boards
13
The advent of machines and women the clothing industries 18801896
22
An age of grim adversity the boot industry 18801896
43
Drawing the line the printing industries 18801900
58
Under the Wages Boards
73
No more Amazons the clothing industries 18971919
81
The workers baffled the boot industry 18971910
100
Diplomacy and guerilla warfare the clothing industries 19191939
137
The Cinderella of the skilled trades the boot industry 19111939
151
Marginal matters the printing industries 19251937
169
Conclusion
180
Selected Employment Statistics Victoria 18801939
193
Notes
207
Bibliography of works cited
244
Index
261

Educating the girls the printing industries 19011925
116
The Era of Federal Wagefixing
131

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