Iron cages: race and culture in 19th-century America

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Oxford University Press, 1979 - History - 385 pages
2 Reviews
A pathbreaking work by one of the leading scholars in the field,Iron Cagesprovides a unique comparative analysis of white attitudes toward Asians, Blacks, Mexicans, and Native Americans in the nineteenth century, offering a cohesive study of the foundations of race and culture in America. With a new epilogue that assesses the prospect for race relations in contemporary American society,Iron Cagesis important reading for anyone interested in the history of race relations in America. In his provocative new epilogue, "The Fourth Iron Cage," Takaki focuses on race in contemporary society within the context of America's nuclear arms-oriented ceconomy. He compares the Asian-American "model minority" and the black underclass, and extends his analysis to Native Americans, Chicanos, and Puerto Ricans.

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Review: Iron Cages: Race and Culture in 19th-Century America

User Review  - Elizabeth - Goodreads

Read this book for a class. Realized the obvious. Read full review

Review: Iron Cages : Race and Culture in 19th-Century America

User Review  - lilia - Goodreads

did not know that that ethnic studies was possible until i read this book and occupied america. Read full review

Contents

DISEASES OF THE MIND AND SKIN
16
WITHIN THE BOWELS OF THE REPUBLIC
36
THREE TECHNOLOGY
145
Copyright

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About the author (1979)

Ronald Takaki is a professor in the Ethnic Studies Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and the author of six books, including Strangers from a Different Shore. He lives in Berkeley, California.