The Captain of the Gray-Horse Troop: A Novel (Google eBook)

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Harper, 1902 - Colorado - 414 pages
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User Review  - MrsLee - LibraryThing

This was quite a surprise to me. I expected it to be overly sentimental and wordy, as so many novels from the early 1900s can be, but instead, it is a gripping story with much information and value ... Read full review

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Page 136 - Curtis's entire summer outlook. Work had dragged heavily upon him during February and March, and there were moments when his enthusiasm ebbed. It was a trying position. He began to understand how a man might start in his duties with the most commendable desire, even solemn resolution, to be ever kindly and patient and self-respecting, and end by cursing the redmen and himself most impartially. Misunderstandings are so easy where two races are forced into daily contact, without knowledge of each other's...
Page 98 - No, I did not," she replied, softly. " Moreover. Crawling Elk is the annalist and storyteller of his tribe. He carries the ' winter count ' and the sacred pipe, and can tell you of every movement of the Tetongs for more than a century and a half. His mind is full of poetry, and his conceptions of the earth and sky are beautiful. He knows little that white men know, and cares for very little that the white man fights for, but his mind teems with lore of the mysterious universe into which he has been...
Page 198 - I have not changed—you have changed." 199 ' He laughed at this. "The woman's last word! Well, I admit it. I have come to love you as a man loves the woman he wishes to make his wife. I'm going to care a great deal, Elsie Bee Bee, if you do not come to me some time.
Page 124 - Young man, do you know who you are fighting?" asked Brisbane, bristling like a bear and showing his teeth a little. Curtis being silent, he went on: " You're lined up against the whole State! Not only the cattlemen round about the reservation, but a majority of the citizens are determined to be rid of those vagabonds. Anybody that knows anything about 'em knows they're a public nuisance. Why should they be allowed to camp on land which they can't use — graze their mangy ponies on lands rich in...
Page 48 - ... light esteem. Andrew Brisbane had entered the State at a time when its mineral wealth lay undeveloped and free to the taker, and having leagued himself with men less masterly than himself but quite as unscrupulous, had set to work to grasp and hold the natural resources of the great Territory — he laid strong fists upon the mines and forests and grass of the wild land. Once grasped, nothing was ever surrendered. It mattered nothing to him and his kind that a race of men already lived upon this...
Page 69 - The best of them," he said to Jennie, "are foolhardy pioneers who have exiled their wives and children for no good reason. The others are cattlemen who fol70 lowed the cavalry in order to fatten their stock under the protection of our guidon." The citizens of Pinon City wondered why their delegates made so little impression on the department, but Streeter was not left long in doubt. The Secretary interrupted him in the midst of his first presentation of the matter. "Mr. Streeter, you are a cattleman,...
Page 124 - ... em knows they're a public nuisance. Why should they be allowed to camp on land which they can't use — graze their mangy ponies on lands rich in minerals — " " Because they are human beings." "Human beings!" sneered Brisbane. "They are nothing but a greasy lot of vermin — worthless from every point of view. Their rights can't stand in the way of civilization." "It is not a question of whether they are clean or dirty, it is a question of justice," Curtis replied, hotly. " They came into the...
Page 115 - ... poor and ambitious soldier might be removed by gentler means, through promotion; and friendly pressure might be brought to bear on the War Department to that effect. Having set himself to the task of clearing the reservation of the Tetongs, a man of Brisbane's power did not hesitate long over the morality of methods, and having decided upon promotion as his method of approaching Curtis, the old man distinctly softened, and made himself agreeable by extending the drive and affably pointing out...
Page 376 - ... with swinging lariats, whooping shrilly, in close pursuit of a flying footman. A moment later a rope looped, the fugitive fell, and the horsemen closed round him in joyous clamor, like dogs around a fox. With a fear that this was one of his men, Curtis raised a great shout, but his voice was lost in the rush and roar of the throng pouring in towards the fugitive.
Page 136 - Everything they do has meaning and sequence. They have developed, like ourselves, through countless generations of life under relatively stable conditions. These material conditions are now giving way, are vanishing, but the mental traits they formed will persist. Think of this when you are impatient with them.

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