The narrative of a voyage of discovery, performed in His Majesty's vessel the Lady Nelson, of sixty tons burthen: with sliding keels, in the years 1800, 1801, and 1802, to New South Wales (Google eBook)

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Libraries Board of South Australia, 1803 - History - 195 pages
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Page 68 - ENE the part that was right ahead appearing like unconnected islands, being four in number, which, on our nearer approach turned out to be two Capes and two high mountains a considerable way in shore. One of them was very like the Table Hill at the Cape of Good Hope, the other stands farther in the country. Both are covered with large trees, as is also the land which is low and flat, as far as the eye can reach. I named the first of these mountains after Captain Schank, and the other Gambier's Mountain....
Page 68 - I was for some time very doubtful whether we should not be obliged to trust to our anchors. A light breeze springing up, and the boat being ahead towing we got our head to the S. The West Cape I called Bridgewater, as already mentioned, and that to the East, Nelson. This is a very deep bay, and with S. winds ought carefully to be avoided. Cape Nelson bears from Cape Bridgewater ENE fifteen or sixteen miles. The country is beautiful, apparently a good soil, plenty of grass and fine woods. Towards...
Page 118 - It is worthy remark, that Jarvis's Bay or Sound is large and commodious, easy of access, affording shelter from all winds, and having room for upwards of 200 sail of ships, with plenty of wood and water. When this Bay comes to be more known, it will be found eligible for vessels bound to Port Jackson, after a long passage from England through meeting with NE winds, and will be the means of saving many lives, as well as much wear and tear.
Page xxvi - ... not being caulked, which defects admit of a quick succession of different sorts of air, heat and cold, wetness and dryness ; but, according to the plan of making the ship more solid, these would, in a great measure be excluded, and ships would last, at least, one third longer, if not double the time they do at present.
Page vi - That if cutters were built flatter, so as to go on the surface, and not draw much water, they would sail much faster, and might still be enabled to carry as much sail, and keep up to the wind, by having their keels descend to a greater depth ; and that the flat side of the keel, when presented to the water, would even make them able to spread more canvas, and hold the water better, than on a construction whereby they present only the circular surface of the body to the wave.
Page 68 - ... the country. Both are covered with large trees, as is also the land which is low and flat, as far as the eye can reach. I named the first of these mountains after Captain Schank, and the other Gambier's Mountain. The first Cape I called Northumberland, after his Grace the Duke of Northumberland, and another smaller but very conspicuous jut of the land, which we plainly saw when abreast of Cape Northumberland, I named Cape Banks.
Page xxvi - Vessels on this construction will last longer than those built according to the present mode. Long experience has discovered, that nothing destroys timber so much as being sometimes wet, at other times dry ; sometimes being exposed to the air, and at other times air excluded from it. This is not the case with ships built according to the construction which has been herein often, but it is hoped not inconsiderately, recommended. It is generally known that the bottom of a ship seldom rots in less than...

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