Antarctic Communities: Species, Structure, and Survival

Front Cover
Bruno Battaglia, José Valencia, D. W. H. Walton
Cambridge University Press, 1997 - Science - 464 pages
0 Reviews
Conservation of biodiversity is best achieved through the management of natural communities, but progress in increasing our understanding of communities remains slow. The study of Antarctic communities can provide a valuable step forward in investigating the control of community development, the utilisation of habitats and the interaction between species in both species-rich and species-poor communities. This book contains chapters characterising the current approaches to both aquatic and terrestrial communities in the Antarctic. From biodiversity to trophic flows, from ecophysiological strategies to the impacts of environmental change and the effects of human disturbance, this volume provides an up-to-the-minute overview of community studies in an area covering ten per cent of the Earth's surface.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Contributors
2
an overview
3
Diversity of lichens in Antarctica
15
Two polar Hydractinia species Cnidaria epibiotic
22
Genetic variation in populations of the moss Bryum
33
Genetic and ecological research on anisakid
39
Molecular phylogeny and evolution of Notothenioid fish
45
Prokaryotic Antarctic biodiversity
51
Seasonal distribution of picocyanobacteria in
178
SURVIVAL MECHANISMS
185
Dietaryrelated mechanisms of survival in Euphausia
193
The role of antifreeze proteins in survival of Antarctic
202
Freezing resistance in Antarctic fish
208
An ontogenetic shift in the use of visual and non
217
Scudiero R 305
224
ADAPTIVE MECHANISMS
249

COMMUNITY STRUCTURE
63
B 107
65
Distribution of phytoplankton organic carbon in
73
Identification of dominant taxa in coastal Antarctic
79
Temporal variability of bacteria phytoplankton and zoo
86
Razouls S
91
Studies on dimethyl sulphide in Antarctic coastal
93
Distributions and dynamics of microbial communities
101
Abundance and distribution of larval krill Euphausia
107
Regoli F 409
111
Trophic flows in the benthic shelf community of
118
Factors governing phytoplankton and particulate
135
Feeding ecology of the Antarctic lamellibranch
142
species structure
152
Microbial communities in soils and on plants from
162
Environment and microbial communities in a tidal
170
glucose6
261
Albergoni
268
3118
276
Seasonality of feeding and lipid content in juvenile
277
Spatial and lifecycle changes in lipid and fatty acid
284
Temperature adaptation and regulations of citrate
295
Purification and characterization of atypical zinc
305
Ecophysiological strategies of terrestrial arthropods
316
Developmental changes and diurnal and seasonal
328
HUMAN IMPACT AND ENVIRONMENTAL
339
Ecological variability in Antarctic coastal
349
Climate change in Kerguelen Islands and colonization
358
Impacts of ozone depletion on Antarctic organisms
367
Effects of solar ultraviolet radiation on primary
375
POSTSCRIPT
453
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (1997)

Professor David Walton began work in 1967 with the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). He is now an Emeritus Fellow at BAS, publishing papers and books on many aspects of Antarctica. Professor Walton represented the international Antarctic scientific community at Antarctic Treaty Meetings for 14 years and was awarded the first SCAR medal for International Scientific Coordination. He was also awarded a Polar Medal by the Queen. The author of more than 100 scientific papers, and more than 250 reviews, popular articles and reports, he has also written and edited several books and has been the editor in chief of the international journal Antarctic Science for the last 25 years.

Bibliographic information