The Phytologist: A Popular Botanical Miscellany, Volume 4, Part 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
George Luxford, Edward Newman
J. Van Voorst, 1851 - Botany
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Page 57 - I WANDERED lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills ; When all at once I saw a crowd, A host of golden daffodils, Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous...
Page 380 - According to their quality, more or less time is occupied in their completion ; the coarser ones may be finished in two or three days, the finest take as many months. The best times for plaiting are the morning hours and the rainy season, when the air is moist; in the middle of the day and in dry clear weather the straw is apt to break, which when the hat is finished is betrayed by knots, and much diminishes the value.
Page iv - Neath cloistered boughs, each floral bell that swingeth And tolls its perfume on the passing air, Makes Sabbath in the fields, and ever ringeth A call to prayer. Not to the domes where crumbling arch and column Attest the feebleness of mortal hand, But to that fane, most catholic and solemn, Which God hath...
Page 170 - Seventh Edition, with Additions and Corrections ; and numerous Figures illustrative of the Umbelliferous Plants, the Composite Plants, the Grasses, and the Ferns.
Page 379 - The leaves are gathered before they unfold, all their ribs and coarser veins removed, and the rest, without being separated from the base of the leaf, is reduced to shreds. After having been put in the sun for a day, and tied into a knot, the straw is immersed into boiling water until it becomes white.
Page 379 - Manta, Monte Christi, and other parts of Ecuador. The hats are worn almost in the whole American continent and the West Indies, and would probably be equally used in Europe, did not their high price, varying from two to 150 dollars, prevent their importation.
Page 160 - According to annual custom, the Council have to make the following Report on the state and progress of the Society during the past year. The number of Members at the last Anniversary was, Ordinary Members, 141 ; Associates and Honorary, 5 ; giving a total of 146.
Page 200 - A man may see how this world goes with no eyes. Look with thine ears; see how yon' justice rails upon yon
Page 295 - Sarracenia adunca, and, with some difficulty, forcing them under the lid or cover of its leaf, to deposit them in the tubular part, which was half filled with water, all the leaves on being examined, were found crammed with dead or drowning flies. The S. purpurea is usually observed to be stored with putrefying insects, whose scent is perceptible as we pass the plant in a garden; for the margin of its leaves is beset with inverted hairs, which, like the wires of a mouse-trap, render it very difficult...
Page 211 - Kgnosa are certainly specifically distinct from S. herbacea; but whether they are so from each other, and whether, if that be the case, S. lignosa ought not to be considered as a variety of S. fruticosa, L., and the plant with tubercled seeds to be called S. megastachya, I do not feel competent to decide. The other forms of S. pusilla, S. intermedia and S. ramosissima, may perhaps be varieties of .V. herbacea, but this also is a subject for further investigation.

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