A Sailor's Log: Water-tender Frederick T. Wilson, USN, on Asiatic Station, 1899-1901 (Google eBook)

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Kent State University Press, Jan 1, 2004 - Biography & Autobiography - 390 pages
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Frederick T. Wilson was an engineer who carried the rank of first-class petty officer and served in one of the US Navy's first modern battleships, the USS Oregon. He also participated in the relief of Peking during the Boxer rebellion. This is an uncensored picture of enlisted life.
  

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Contents

To Asiatic Station
1
Manila
48
Nagasaki
64
Aground in the Yellow Sea
95
Kure Japan
126
Woosung China
163
Shanghai
188
Afloat Ashore in Shanghai
217
Hong Kong
276
Amoy China Yokohama
308
Homeward Bound
328
Epilogue
354
Notes
360
Bibliography
380
Index
382
Copyright

BoloMen Routine Discipline
250

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Page 382 - William R. Braisted, The United States Navy in the Pacific, 1897-1909 (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1958), and The United States Navy in the Pacific, 1909-1922 (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1971).
Page 381 - ... provincial Japanese cities. The unfortunate inmates, decked out in gorgeous raiment, sit in rows with gold screens behind, and protected from the outside by iron bars. As the whole quarter is under special municipal surveillance, perfect order prevails, enabling the stranger to study, while walking along tho streets, the manner in which the Japanese have solved one of the vexed questions of all ages.
Page 381 - the most bold and daring act of the age.
Page 382 - James R. Reckner, Teddy Roosevelt's Great White Fleet (Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1988).
Page 381 - Soubrette," a theatrical term for a maidservant or lady's maid as a character in a play or opera, usually one of a pert, coquettish, or intriguing character, or an actress playing such a part.
Page xxix - He was not missed from among us, for during his month aboard the Lancaster he had never, so far as I knew, spoken a single word to one of the enlisted men of the crew."17 The men thus saw the chaplains first as officers and only secondarily as men of God. In a navy in which the officers...

About the author (2004)

James R. Reckner is associate professor of history at Texas Tech University, where he is also director of the Vietnam Center.

Bibliographic information