The Man in the moone, or, The English fortune teller: from the unique copy, printed in 1609, preserved in the Bodleian library (Google eBook)

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Printed for the Percy Society by T. Richards, 1849 - Literary Collections - 56 pages
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Page 21 - So the creature followed his master, and another knocked at the gate. The lewde woman commeth to knowe her fortune, whom Mockso describeth entring. " Who is that ?" said Fido. " One with a maske forsooth, because you may aske," said Mockso. " A woman of tall stature and upright bodie (it is wel if her life be like it), high forehead, round cheeks, dimpled chinne, sleeke necke, and slender waste ; in a light coloured hat, light coloured fanne, light coloured gown ; though she were in the darke, she...
Page 12 - he is at his breake-fast : it is his heaven, or rather hell: I should thinke it sendeth forth such mistes, fogges, and vapours, five chimnies, well fewel'd, vent not more smoake then his mouth and nostrils: a man were better have his house situated between two brewhouses then abut upon his mansion ; I had rather thrust my head into a Jakes then peepe into his chamber. And nothing so noisome were it to bee yeoman to a close stoole, as to continue within fortie foote of his breathing, yet is the causer...
Page 13 - So you, only by conceit, thinke richly of the operation of your Indian pudding, having contrarie qualities in it, a thing repugnant to philosophy, and working miraculous matters, a quillit above nature. The Man in the lioone, 1609,sig.
Page 39 - ... cannot conceale your thoughts, wordes, and workes, never laugh in your sleeve how you have gulled, or bulled, your husband ; nay, many are so impudent they care not who know it, they thinke it a credite to bee notorious, an honour to have gallants seeke unto them ; where carrion is, it is no marvell to find kites ; pleasure hath an amiable face, but a loathsome bodie ; a sweete taste, but a sowre digestion ; a delicious life, but a miserable death : looke upon that plot in my garden, you see...
Page 17 - ... to be in favour with many and sundry beauties : you shall feele the contrarie, pride will procure your fall, when you wot not of it ; excesse devoure your riches ere you are aware ; variety decay your bodie when you thinke it doth most delight it; and when your bodie is decayed, your wealth devoured, yourselfe fallen, goe to your gossips, which now will hang like goodly jewels about your necke, and come with your purse emptie : stabis, Homere, foras, you may stand like an impecunious whore-master...
Page 36 - ... long as he hath her; yet shee will flaunt it with the finest, and gadde abroad with the giddiest; looking for greater attendance then an empresse, and more duty then a dutchesse; envying all that are more bravely trapped then herselfe, and confederate with few but such as are wantonly intrapped as she is ; no fashion can be extant, but she must have a fling at it; no sight to be seene, but she must view it; not a gewgaw to be heard of but she must have it; she will buy nothing that is cheape,...
Page 39 - One as melancholic as a cat," answered Mockso, " and glared upon me as if he would have looked through me : sure hee lacketh something, he gazeth so about him : holde not downe thine head for shame, like a beast ; but erect thy countenance, like a man. High-ho, how he sigheth, and beteth his brest, as if there were something there angering him. Why doth he feele his forehead so often ? it is smooth enough he doubteth ; I lay my life they wil sprowt out shortly, and shal soone become as huge-headed...
Page 41 - ... allure her, no perswasions winne her : but if she be disloyall, keepe her never so close, she will sometime or other flie out in despight of you. Ut jam servaris bene corpus adultera mens est, Nee custodiri ni velit ipsa potest. " When Jupiter loved lo, a delicious damsell, his wife being mistrustfull, dogged him to finde out his dealing ; who, to conceale his fault, turned the lady into an heifer, which Juno begged, and resigned to the custodie of Argus, who, although he was faigned to have...
Page 4 - ... with his serving-men. This I observed, and sat very sadly, till a striplin requested me to follow him where the old man sat at a table furnished, not superfluously, but with sufficient nourishment ; downe he bad me sit and welcome. Grace he said (then thought I, there is no feare in this place if there be grace), that which stood before me I fed on, and dranke when neede required : being well refreshed, as he beganne with thanksgiving, so he ended supper, and then said thus soberly unto me. "...
Page 19 - though he be no drunkard, yet he is none of his owne man ; he was a pretty boy, an handsome stripling, and is a proper man ; peevish in his childhood, proude in his youth, prodigall now in his best yeares : he spendeth his portion in hope of preferment, wasteth his substance in liewe of advancement, consumeth quite all in expectation of some requitall; his greatest felicity is to court the chamber-maides in a corner, and his chiefest exercise to make his masters friends dependants drunke ; hee fawneth...

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