God's Trombones: Seven Negro Sermons in Verse

Front Cover
Penguin, 1927 - Poetry - 56 pages
31 Reviews
The inspirational sermons of the old Negro preachers are set down as poetry in this collection -- a classic for more than forty years, frequently dramatized, recorded, and anthologized. Mr. Johnson tells in his preface of hearing these same themes treated by famous preachers in his youth; some of the sermons are still current, and like the spirituals they have taken a significant place in black folk art. In transmuting their essence into original and moving poetry, the author has also ensured the survival of a great oral tradition. Book jacket.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
20
4 stars
6
3 stars
5
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: God's Trombones: Seven Negro Sermons in Verse

User Review  - Goodreads

Wonderful. Še aužor was not really a Christian, so he only set in verse sermons he remembered from his youž from folk preachers; še result does contain a few heresies, such as God feeling lonely and creating by acts (not speech), but yet is deeply moving. To read aloud. Read full review

Review: God's Trombones: Seven Negro Sermons in Verse

User Review  - David Ward - Goodreads

God's Trombones: Seven Negro Sermons in Verse by James Weldon Johnson (Viking Press 1969)(811). This is a transcription in verse form of seven famous and fabulous sermon topics in the Black church tradition. This is beautiful poetry. My rating: 7/10, finished 1975. Read full review

Contents

LISTEN LORD A PRAYER
13
THE CREATION
17
THE PRODIGAL SON
21
GO DOWN DEATH A FUNERAL SERMON
27
NOAH BUILT THE ARK
31
THE CRUCIFIXION
39
LET MY PEOPLE GO
45
THE JUDGMENT DAY
53
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1927)

Born in Jacksonville Fla. in 1871, James Weldon Johnson was one of the leaders of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. His career was varied and included periods as a teacher, lawyer, songwriter (with his brother J. Rosamond Johnson), and diplomat (as United States Consul to Puerto Cabello, Venezuela, from 1906 to 1909). Among his most famous writings are Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man, published anonymously in 1912, and God's Trombones: Seven Negro Sermons in Verse (1927), the winner of the Harmon Gold Award. He was also editor of several anthologies of African-American poetry and spirituals, and in 1933 his autobiography, Along This Way, was published. He served as Secretary to the NAACP from 1916 to 1930 and was a professor of literature at Fisk University in Nashville from 1930 until his death in 1938.

Bibliographic information