Orthodoxy (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Sep 1, 2007 - Religion - 168 pages
18 Reviews
Originally published in 1908, Orthodoxy is a companion book for Chesterton's Heretics. In this volume, considered a classic example of Christian apologetic writing, Chesterton answers his detractors by providing his own philosophy for living a Christian life. By necessity, he says, the book must begin with how he came to believe and follow the development of his own faith. Only then could his words seem sincere. Christianity, as Chesterton views it, is the perfect answer to every one of humanity's great questions. Christians and spiritual seekers will find Chesterton's ruminations an engaging and interesting read. English writer GILBERT KEITH CHESTERTON (1874-1936) was an accomplished author in many disciplines, including poetry, journalism, and fiction. His witty, humorous style earned him the title of the "prince of paradox." He wrote 80 books-and nearly 4,000 essays-on a variety of topics, the most popular being The Man Who Was Thursday (1908).
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
13
4 stars
3
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
1

Chuck Colson said it best

User Review  - Mark Tross - Christianbook.com

Why do we confess to believe The Word, when we refuse to read it, especially when Jesus says, "If you love Me, you'll obey my commandments." Even is we're reading The Bible, we'll pick and choose ... Read full review

Needs looking into

User Review  - Jasmine - Christianbook.com

I am not a great fan of e-books, but have downloaded one or two over a period of time. Chesterton's Orthodoxy was one I was interested in due to the erosion of Christianity under the Liberalism of the ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
6
III
22
IV
38
V
58
VI
74
VII
95
VIII
117
IX
134
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 11 - The madman is not the man who has lost his reason. The madman is the man who has lost everything except his reason.
Page 9 - Imagination does not breed insanity. Exactly what does breed insanity is reason. Poets do not go mad; but chess-players do. Mathematicians go mad, and cashiers; but creative artists very seldom. I am not, as will be seen, in any sense attacking logic; I only say that this danger does lie in logic, not in imagination.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2007)

Gilbert Keith Chesterton was born in London, England, in 1874. He began his education at St Paul's School, and later went on to study art at the Slade School, and literature at University College in London. Chesterton wrote a great deal of poetry, as well as works of social and literary criticism. Among his most notable books are The Man Who Was Thursday, a metaphysical thriller, and The Everlasting Man, a history of humankind's spiritual progress. After Chesterton converted to Catholicism in 1922, he wrote mainly on religious topics. Chesterton is most known for creating the famous priest-detective character Father Brown, who first appeared in "The Innocence of Father Brown." Chesterton died in 1936 at the age of 62.

Bibliographic information