Nature: The nature of human nature

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David Inglis, John Bone, Rhoda Wilkie
Taylor & Francis, 2005 - Nature - 4 pages
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Many influential stances within the social sciences regard nature in one of two ways: either as none of their concern (which is with the social and cultural aspects of human existence), or as wholly a social and cultural fabrication. But there is also another strand of social scientific thinking that seeks to understand the interplay between social and cultural factors on one side and natural factors on the other.
These volumes contain the main contributions that have been made within each of these streams of thought. The selections illustrate to the reader the complexity of the various positions within these streams, and the strengths and limitations of each perspective. A new introduction places these articles in their historical and intellectual context and the volumes are completed with an extensive index and chronological table of contents.
  

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Contents

Have we a nature?
3
Part nature part culture
20
How different are humans from other animals?
32
can other animals have culture?
76
The similarities and differences between human
91
the debate on the limits to humanity
123
sociobiology
139
gossip
159
The pursuit of human nature in sociobiology
173
Sociobiology and sociology
189
Is the acquisition of social categories based
230
Feelings
263
An argument for basic emotions
294
Critique of the vulgar sociobiology
325
On the use and misuse of Darwinism in the study
350
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About the author (2005)

David Inglis lecturers in the Department of Sociology, University of Aberdeen.
John Hughson is Principal Research Fellow in the Division of Media, Sociology and Cultural Studies at University of Wolverhampton.

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