Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 12, 2004 - History - 368 pages
19 Reviews
People of European descent form the bulk of the population in most of the temperate zones of the world--North America, Australia and New Zealand. The military successes of European imperialism are easy to explain because in many cases they were achieved by using firearms against spears. Alfred Crosby, however, explains that the Europeans' displacement and replacement of the native peoples in the temperate zones was more a matter of biology than of military conquest. Now in a new edition with a new preface, Crosby revisits his classic work and again evaluates the ecological reasons for European expansion. Alfred W. Crosby is the author of the widely popular and ground-breaking books,The Measure of Reality (Cambridge, 1996), and America's Forgotten Pandemic (Cambridge, 1990). His books have received the Ralph Waldo Emerson Prize, the Medical Writers Association Prize and been named by the Los Angeles Times as among the best books of the year. He taught at the University of Texas, Austin for over 20 years. First Edition Hb (1986): 0-521-32009-7 First Edition Pb (1987): 0-521-33613-9
  

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Review: Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900 (Studies in Environment and History)

User Review  - Robert Ripson - Goodreads

If you are a germ-a-phobe, this may not be the book for you. This an interesting look at how, not only military, social, and economic imperialism shaped the world, but how the seemingly insignificant ... Read full review

Review: Ecological Imperialism: The Biological Expansion of Europe, 900-1900 (Studies in Environment and History)

User Review  - Alger - Goodreads

A classic that is now more thought provoking than useful as a method of seeing history. I love this book, and its influence is wide ranging, but an uncritical reading can lead one straight to Jared ... Read full review

Contents

List of Illustrations
xiii
Preface to the new edition
xv
Acknowledgments
xxi
Prologue
1
Pangaea revisited the Neolithic reconsidered
8
The Norse and the Crusaders
41
The Fortunate Isles
70
Winds
104
Animals
171
Ills
195
New Zealand
217
Explanations
269
Conclusion
294
What was the smallpox in New South Wales in 1789?
309
Notes
312
Index
361

Within reach beyond grasp
132
Weeds
145

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Page ix - The discovery of America, the rounding of the Cape, opened up fresh ground for the rising bourgeoisie. The East-Indian and Chinese markets, the colonization of America, trade with the colonies, the increase in the means of exchange and in commodities generally, gave to commerce, to navigation, to industry, an impulse never before known...
Page ix - The discovery of America, and that of a passage to the East Indies by the Cape of Good Hope, are the two greatest and most important events recorded in the history of mankind.

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About the author (2004)

Alfred W. Crosby is a Professor Emeritus in American Studies, History and Geography at the University of Texas at Austin, where he taught for over 20 years. His previous books include America's Forgotten Pandemic: The Influenza of 1918 (2nd Edition, Cambridge, 2003), Throwing Fire: Projectile Technology Through History (Cambridge, 2002), The Measure of Reality: Quantification and Western Society, 1250-1600 (Cambridge, 1997). The Measure of Reality was chosen by the Los Angeles Times as one of the 100 most important books of 1997.

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