Granny D: You're Never Too Old to Raise a Little Hell

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Random House Publishing Group, Apr 8, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 320 pages
12 Reviews
1. At one point Doris mentions the difficulty of being a “soft news story in a hard news world.” How does publicity function as a vehicle for change? How does the media enable one person to have an effect and mobilize people? Are there other examples of people like Doris? 2. How can we use Doris’s model of taking advantage of own strengths–whatever they may be–to achieve a goal? 3. Before she begins her trip, Doris declares, “I like to compete, even if it is against people’s expectations, and I do not favor losing.” How does her competitive nature present itself in the book? 4. How does Doris Haddock fit into the American Progressive Era and populist tradition? Who else in the American spotlight of past or present do you feel evokes the ideals behind this movement? 5. Discuss Doris’s feelings about the importance of family, friends, and community. How do these things play into her ideal regarding the American political structure? 6. How do Doris’s memories function in the text? Would you categorize GRANNY D as a memoir or a political tract or both? 7. Consider the changes in women’s lives that have taken place during Doris’s time (Doris was kicked out of Emerson College for getting married, but her daughter went on to graduate from Smith. Doris comments later in the book that it’s “wonderful to see so many women highly placed in news organizations…Women reporters…have been around since before my time. But now they are running newspapers.”). Do you consider Doris to be a strong female role model? Why or why not? Doris states that being “young and attractive [is] the essence of being female in this culture.” Is this a positive or negative statement? 8. Doris often relied on strangers during her walk, and in many ways, GRANNY D is a catalogue of the names of people whom she met along her way; how does this inclusion of regular people in the storyline contribute to her point regarding campaign finance reform? 9. How does Doris’s method of directly addressing the reader in the second person affect the book’s tone? Does this also contribute to her message about democracy and politics? 10. Doris contends that the reason behind the dissolution of family strength is that “In today’s world, millions of laboring parents no longer have the ability to meet their responsibilities to their families, and everything falls down without that centerpost.” Do you agree or disagree with this argument? 11. Discuss Doris’s insight into relations between people of different origins and backgrounds when she walks with Golam Mohammed and remembers her mother’s feelings towards the German family in town during World War I. 12. How does Doris’s experience working with Ida Thomas and later for Mrs. P inform her perspective? 13. Revisit Doris’s speech at the Lorriane Motel on September 7, 1999 and discuss her connection to Martin Luther King and her comparison of campaign finance reform to the civil rights struggle.

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Review: Granny D: You're Never Too Old to Raise a Little Hell

User Review  - Chris Lichtenfelt - Goodreads

We should all remember: "You're never too old" Read full review

Review: Granny D: Walking Across America in My Ninetieth Year

User Review  - Mary Louise Clifford - Goodreads

A delightful recounting of Granny's one-year walk across the United States to emphasize the need for campaign finance reform. She describes the many people she met, the hospitality she received, and ... Read full review

Contents

Desert Overture
3
Getting in Shape
11
A Man Magnet
21
Copyright

28 other sections not shown

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About the author (2003)

Doris Haddock is a retired executive secretary and great-grandmother of twelve. She lives in Dublin, New Hampshire. Government reformer Dennis Burke accompanied Doris Haddock on her walk. He lives in Phoenix, Arizona.


From the Hardcover edition.