The Jean Baudrillard Reader

Front Cover
Steve Redhead
Columbia University Press, 2008 - Philosophy - 226 pages
1 Review

Jean Baudrillard (1929-2007) was a controversial social and cultural theorist known for his trenchant analyses of media and technological communication. Belonging to the generation of French thinkers that included Gilles Deleuze, Jean-François Lyotard, Michel Foucault, and Jacques Lacan, Baudrillard has at times been vilified by his detractors, but the influence of his work on critical thought and pop culture is impossible to deny (many might recognize his name from The Matrix movies, which claimed to be based on the French theorist's ideas).

Steve Redhead takes a fresh look at Baudrillard in relation to the intellectual and political climates in which he wrote. Baudrillard sought to produce a theory of modernity, but the modern world of the 1950s was radically different from the reality of the early twenty-first century. Beginning with Baudrillard's initial publications in the 1960s and concluding with his writings on 9/11 and Abu Ghraib, Redhead guides the reader through Baudrillard's difficult texts and unorthodox views on current issues. He also proposes an original theory of Baudrillard's relation to postmodernism, presenting the theorist's work as "non-postmodernist," after Bruno Latour's concept of "non-modernity." Each section of the Reader includes an extract from one of Baudrillard's writings, prefaced by a short bibliographical introduction that places the piece in context and puts the debate surrounding the theorist into sharp perspective. The conflict over Baudrillard's legacy stems largely from the fact that a comprehensive selection of his writings has yet to be translated and collected into one volume. The Jean Baudrillard Reader provides an expansive and much-needed portrait of the critic's resonant work.

  

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Review: The Jean Baudrillard Reader

User Review  - Matthew Dodson - Goodreads

I'm a casual philosophical reader and found this introductory text to Baudrillard to be fairly accessible. Baudrillard was rightly criticized for taking his arguments to the extreme but his ideas are ... Read full review

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Contents

On NonPostmodernity
1
Mass Media Culture
14
The Linguistic Imaginary
33
The Ecliptic of Sex
49
Implosion and Deterrence
57
Please Follow Me
71
The Evil Demon of Images
83
Is It Really Taking Place?
99
The Millennium or the Suspense of the Year 2000
153
Truth or Radicality? The Future of Architecture
172
The Art Conspiracy
186
Requiem for the Twin Towers
192
Pornography of War
198
Art Contemporary with Itself
203
The Pyres of Autumn
212
Reading Jean Baudrillard
217

Pataphysics of the Year 2000
122
Impossible Exchange
132

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About the author (2008)

Steve Redhead is professor of sport and media cultures in the Chelsea School at the University of Brighton, specializing in social and cultural theory, post-youth culture, law and popular culture, and football culture. His recent publications include Paul Virilio: Theorist for an Accelerated Culture and Subculture to Clubcultures: An Introduction to Popular Cultural Studies. His Web site is http://www.steveredhead.com.

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