A history of classical scholarship ... (Google eBook)

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At the University press, 1906 - Literary Criticism
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Page 114 - If these writings of the Greeks agree with the book of God, they are useless, and need not be preserved: if they disagree, they are pernicious, and ought to be destroyed.
Page 335 - DRINK to me only with thine eyes, And I will pledge with mine ; Or leave a kiss but in the cup, And I 'll not look for wine. The thirst that from the soul doth rise, Doth ask a drink divine : But might I of Jove's nectar sup, I would not change for thine.
Page 267 - Wisdom hath builded her house, she hath hewn out her seven pillars: She hath killed her beasts; she hath mingled her wine; she hath also furnished her table. She...
Page 61 - Thence what the lofty grave tragedians taught In chorus or iambic, teachers best Of moral prudence, with delight received In brief sententious precepts, while they treat Of fate, and chance, and change in human life, High actions, and high passions best describing : Thence to the famous orators repair, Those ancient, whose resistless eloquence Wielded at will that fierce democratic, Shook the arsenal, and fulmined over Greece To Macedon and Artaxerxes...
Page 47 - ... please, Guard them, and him within protect from harms. He can requite thee; for he knows the charms That call fame on such gentle acts as these, And he can spread thy name o'er lands and seas, Whatever clime the sun's bright circle warms. Lift not thy spear against the Muses
Page 73 - Tragedy, then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic omament, the several kinds being found in separate parts of the play; in the form of action, not of narrative; through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions.
Page 599 - And the second time we came to " New College, after we had declared your injunctions, we " found all the great quadrant court full of the leaves of " Dunce, the wind blowing them into every corner.
Page 61 - Aristodemus did not hear the beginning of the discourse, and he was only half awake, but the chief thing which he remembered, was Socrates insisting to the other two that the genius of comedy was the same as that of tragedy, and that the writer of tragedy ought to be a writer of comedy also.
Page 31 - Homer is the greatest of poets and first of tragedy writers; but we must remain firm in our conviction that hymns to the gods and praises of famous men are the only poetry which ought to be admitted into our State. For if you go beyond this and allow the honeyed muse to enter, either in epic or lyric verse, not law and the reason of mankind, which by common consent have ever been deemed best, but pleasure and pain will be the rulers in our State.
Page 670 - The late Latin couplet summing up the Seven Arts in two memorial lines corresponding to these divisions is well known to many who may not have heard the name of its author, or rather its earliest recorder4 : ' GRAM loquitur ; DIA vera docet ; RHET verba colorat ; Mus canit ; AR numerat ; GE ponderat ; AST colit astra'.

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