Festivals, Games, and Amusements (Google eBook)

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J. J. Harper, 1833 - Games - 355 pages
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Page 314 - Lo, the poor Indian! whose untutored mind Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind: His soul, proud science never taught to stray Far as the solar walk or Milky Way: Yet simple Nature to his hope has given.
Page 127 - In the month of May, namely, on May-day in the morning, every man, except impediment, would walk into the sweet meadows and green woods, there to rejoice their spirits with the beauty and savour of sweet flowers, and with the harmony of birds, praising God in their kind...
Page 136 - Come, bring with a noise, My merry, merry boys, The Christmas log to the firing ; While my good dame, she Bids ye all be free, And drink to your hearts
Page 300 - Thine be the laurel, then; thy blooming age Can best, if any can, support the stage; Which so declines, that shortly we may see Players and plays reduced to second infancy. Sharp to the world, but thoughtless of renown, They plot not on the stage, but on the town, And, in despair, their empty pit to fill, Set up some foreign monster in a bill. Thus they jog on, still tricking, never thriving, And murdering plays, which they miscall reviving.
Page 125 - Come, let us go while we are in our prime, And take the harmless folly of the time We shall grow old apace, and die Before we know our liberty. Our life is short, and our days run As fast away as does the sun...
Page 23 - Now such was the height of Greek fashions, and increase of heathenish manners, through the exceeding profaneness of Jason, that ungodly wretch, and no high-priest, that the priests had no courage to serve any more at the altar ; but despising the temple, and neglecting the sacrifices, hastened to be partakers of the unlawful allowance in the place of exercise, after the game of discus called them forth ; not setting by the honours of their fathers, but liking the glory of the Grecians best of all.
Page 123 - RULES TO KNOW WHEN THE MOVEABLE FEASTS AND HOLYDAYS BEGIN. EASTER DAY, on which the rest depend, is always the First Sunday after the Full Moon which happens upon, or next after the Twenty-first Day of March ; and if the Full Moon happens upon a Sunday, Easter Day is the Sunday after.
Page 137 - Box, or money gathered against that time, that masses might be made by the priests to the saints to forgive the people the debaucheries of that time : and from this, servants had the liberty to get box money, that they too might be enabled to pay the priest for his masses, knowing well the truth of the proverb : "No Penny, No Pater Noster." Athenian Oracle, by Dunton, i., 360.
Page 147 - Her majesty," says a courtier, writing to Sir Robert Sidney, " is well and excellently disposed to hunting, for every second day she is on horseback and continues the sport long.
Page 318 - They then feast on the new* corn and fruits, and dance and sing for three days, " and the four following days they receive visits and rejoice with their friends from neighboring towns who have in like manner purified and prepared themselves.

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