The Book Thief: The True Crimes of Daniel Spiegelman (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 2006 - Social Science - 181 pages
8 Reviews

In the spring of 1994, Daniel Spiegelman shinnied up an abandoned book lift in Columbia University's Butler Library, dismantled a wall, stole books, reassembled the wall, and snuck back down the shaft. Over a three-month period he did this more than a dozen times. He eventually escaped to Europe with roughly $1.8 million in rare books, letters and manuscripts. When he was caught in the Netherlands, he tried to avoid extradition to the U.S. by telling the Dutch authorities he was a financier of the Oklahoma City bombing--knowing they wouldn't extradite someone facing the death penalty. Eventually, the FBI got him back to New York, where he finally stood trial for his crimes. Including a retelling of the crimes, dialogue from the court transcripts, and explanations of the legal consequences and intricacies, McDade recounts all the sordid elements of this true crime caper in vivid detail.

In the spring of 1994, Daniel Spiegelman shinnied up an abandoned book lift in Columbia University's Butler Library, dismantled a wall, stole books, reassembled the wall, and snuck back down the shaft. Over a three-month period he did this more than a dozen times. He eventually escaped to Europe with roughly $1.8 million in rare books, letters and manuscripts. When he was caught in the Netherlands, he tried to avoid extradition to the U.S. by telling the Dutch authorities he was a financier of the Oklahoma City bombing-- knowing they wouldn't extradite someone facing the death penalty. Eventually, the FBI got him back to New York, where he finally stood trial for his crimes.

Four years, four attorneys, one determined librarian, numerous court appearances, and one guilty plea after the initial crime took place, a federal judge in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York meted out a sentence that ran counter to the plea agreement, nearly doubling the ordinary sentence for a crime of that magnitude. In so doing, he created a new justification for departure from Federal Sentencing Guidelines. Basing his decision on the potential harm inflicted on society as a whole by the theft of rare and unique elements of our cultural heritage, Judge Kaplan redefined the value of such rare items and justified his sentencing by determining the value to be beyond the monetary realm. McDade recounts all the sordid elements of this true-crime caper in vivid detail, presenting readers with a retelling of the crimes, dialogue from the court transcripts, and explanations of the legal consequences and intricacies. In addition to the significant, overall legal themes, "The Book Thief" describes two prison escape attempts, one suicide attempt, a jailed defense lawyer, and the aftermath of this unique and interesting case.

  

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Review: The Book Thief: The True Crimes of Daniel Spiegelman

User Review  - John Pinkney - Goodreads

An interesting story over burdened by the legalese and trial transcripts, which are far from compelling stuff to the layman, but must be utterly fascinating to lawyers, which McDade is. Still, the ... Read full review

Review: The Book Thief: The True Crimes of Daniel Spiegelman

User Review  - Jessica - Goodreads

So I may be a tad biased as the author is one of my favorite law school classmates; however this is a wonderful read - factually accurate, painstaking legal research and when we hear the author's voice we get wonderful playful moments of artful storytelling. Read full review

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Contents

1 A Vault Laid Open
1
2 Smart Thief Bad Crook
23
3 Whoever Is Interested in This Old Letter I Have the Originals
41
4 No Mere Procedural Formality
65
5 The Wrath of Columbia
83
6 A Nice Thing for Counsel to Do
139
7 My Deep Apologies to This Court
163
Epilogue
175
Authors Note
177
Index
179
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Travis Mcdade is the Legal Research columnist for Student Lawyer magazine, an ADA publication for law students. In addition, he is Assistant Professor of Library Administration in the College of Law of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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