Science And Human Behavior

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Simon and Schuster, 1953 - Psychology - 461 pages
11 Reviews
The psychology classic—a detailed study of scientific theories of human nature and the possible ways in which human behavior can be predicted and controlled—from one of the most influential behaviorists of the twentieth century and the author of Walden Two.

“This is an important book, exceptionally well written, and logically consistent with the basic premise of the unitary nature of science. Many students of society and culture would take violent issue with most of the things that Skinner has to say, but even those who disagree most will find this a stimulating book.” —Samuel M. Strong, The American Journal of Sociology

“This is a remarkable book—remarkable in that it presents a strong, consistent, and all but exhaustive case for a natural science of human behavior…It ought to be…valuable for those whose preferences lie with, as well as those whose preferences stand against, a behavioristic approach to human activity.” —Harry Prosch, Ethics
  

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Review: Science and Human Behavior

User Review  - Idris Slimani - Goodreads

Didn't read that much about this subject and I think this book can give you a good coverage and a rich answer about the complexity of human behavior Read full review

Review: Science and Human Behavior

User Review  - Shenandoah Smith - Goodreads

bla the book was okay I give it a 3 out of five.. The book had a good flow but was not that interesting I was referred to this book by a friend. Read full review

Contents

CAN SCIENCE HELP?
3
A SCIENCE OF BEHAVIOR
11
HI WHY ORGANISMS BEHAVE
23
THE ANALYSIS OF BEHAVIOR
43
REFLEXES AND CONDITIONED REFLEXES
45
OPERANT BEHAVIOR
59
SHAPING AND MAINTAINING OPERANT BEHAVIOR
91
OPERANT DISCRIMINATION
107
PRIVATE EVENTS IN A NATURAL SCIENCE
257
THE SELF
283
THE BEHAVIOR OF PEOPLE IN GROUPS
295
SOCIAL BEHAVIOR
297
PERSONAL CONTROL
313
GROUP CONTROL
323
SECTION V CONTROLLING AGENCIES
331
GOVERNMENT AND LAW
333

THE CONTROLLING ENVIRONMENT
129
DEPRIVATION AND SATIATION
141
EMOTION
160
AVERSION AVOIDANCE ANXIETY
171
PUNISHMENT
182
FUNCTION VERSUS ASPECT
194
THE ANALYSIS OF COMPLEX CASES
204
THE INDIVIDUAL AS A WHOLE
225
SELFCONTROL
227
THINKING
242
RELIGION
350
PSYCHOTHERAPY
359
ECONOMIC CONTROL
384
EDUCATION
402
SECTION Vh THE CONTROL OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR XXVII CULTURE AND CONTROL
415
DESIGNING A CULTURE
426
THE PROBLEM OF CONTROL
437
INDEX
451
Copyright

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About the author (1953)

B. F. Skinner, an American behavioral psychologist, is known for his many contributions to learning theory. His Behavior of Organisms (1938) reports his experiments with the study of reflexes. Walden Two (1949), a utopian novel, describes a planned community in which positive rather than negative reinforcers serve to maintain appropriate behavior; the novel stimulated the founding of some experimental communities. In Beyond Freedom and Dignity (1971), Skinner attempted to show that only what he called a technology of behavior could save democracy from the many individual and social problems that plague it. (An early example of this technology is the so-called Skinner box for conditioning a human child.) A teacher at Harvard University from 1948 until his retirement, Skinner was for some the model of the objective scientist, for others the epitome of the heartless behaviorist who would turn people into automatons.

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