Religions of the Ancient Near East (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 22, 2010 - Religion
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This 2011 book is a history of religious life in the Ancient Near East from the beginnings of agriculture to Alexander the Great's invasion in the 300s BCE. Daniel C. Snell traces key developments in the history, daily life and religious beliefs of the people of Ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel and Iran. His research investigates the influence of those ideas on the West, with particular emphasis on how religious ideas from this historical and cultural milieu still influence the way modern cultures and religions view the world. Designed to be accessible to students and readers with no prior knowledge of the period, the book uses fictional vignettes to add interest to its material, which is based on careful study of archaeological remains and preserved texts. The book will provide a thoughtful summary of the Ancient Near East and includes a comprehensive bibliography to guide readers in further study of related topics.
  

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Contents

defining time and space
1
early inklings
7
gods godsgods
14
figures and maps
16
cities states and gods
30
the lure of egypt 40001400 bce
54
the godsof egypt
66
the akhenaten dream13501300 bce
72
gods and people
95
the lord isone israel inits environment
103
the turning
115
the good god and the bad god
126
the lands ofbaal
132
greece etruria rome and conveying traditions
139
the dead hand ofthepast and thelivinggod
148
17
162

maps
74
practice in egypt
80
the international age14001000 bce
84

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About the author (2010)

Daniel C. Snell is L. J. Semrod Presidential Professor of History at the University of Oklahoma, Norman. He has also taught at the University of Washington, Connecticut College, Barnard College, Gustavus Adolphus College and Otterbein College. He is the author of eight books, most recently A Companion to the Ancient Near East (2007).

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