The poetical works of Horace Smith. 2vols (Google eBook)

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1846
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Page 8 - Neath cloistered boughs each floral bell that swingeth And tolls its perfume on the passing air Makes Sabbath in the fields, and ever ringeth A call to prayer : Not to the domes where crumbling arch and column Attest the feebleness of mortal hand, But to that fane most catholic and solemn Which God hath plann'd, To that cathedral, boundless as our wonder, Whose quenchless lamps the sun and moon supply, Its choir the winds and waves, its organ thunder, Its dome the sky.
Page 8 - To that cathedral, boundless as our wonder, Whose quenchless lamps the sun and moon supply Its choir the winds and waves, its organ thunder, Its dome the sky. There as in solitude and shade I wander Through the green aisles, or, stretched upon the sod, Awed by the silence, reverently ponder The ways of God...
Page 13 - Or doffed thine own to let Queen Dido pass, Or held, by Solomon's own invitation, A torch at the great temple's dedication. I need not ask thee if that hand, when...
Page 251 - These volumes have the fascination of romance united to the integrity of history. The work is written by a lady of considerable learning, indefatigable industry, and careful judgment. All these qualifications for a biographer and an historian she has brought to bear upon the subject of her volumes, and from them has resulted a narrative interesting to all, and more particularly interesting to that portion of the community to whom the more refined researches of literature afford pleasure and instruction....
Page 249 - Having filled at different times the high offices of Minister of the Interior, of Finance, of Foreign Affairs, and President of the Council, M. Thiers has enjoyed facilities beyond the reach of every other biographer of Napoleon for procuring, from exclusive and authentic sources, the choicest materials for his present work. As guardian to the archives of the state, he had access to diplomatic papers and other documents of the highest importance, hitherto known only to a privileged few, and the publication...
Page 11 - Memnonium was in all its glory, And time had not begun to overthrow Those temples, palaces, and piles stupendous, Of which the very ruins are tremendous.
Page 251 - It contains a mass of every kind of historical matter of interest, which industry and research could collect. We have derived much entertainment and instruction from the work.
Page 73 - There is ! there is ! One primitive and sure ; Religion pure, Unchanged in spirit, though its forms and codes Wear myriad modes, Contains all creeds within its mighty span ; The love of God displayed in love of man.
Page 13 - We have, above-ground, seen some strange mutations: The Roman empire has begun and ended, New worlds have risen, we have lost old nations, And countless kings have into dust been humbled, While not a fragment of thy flesh has crumbled.
Page 251 - Strickland that her research has enabled her to throw new light on many doubtful passages, to bring forth fresh facts, and to render every portion of our annals which she has described an interesting and valuable study. She...

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