Information Feudalism: Who Owns the Knowledge Economy?

Front Cover
Earthscan, 2002 - Law - 253 pages
3 Reviews
New intellectual property regimes are entrenching new inequalities. Access to information is fundamental to the exercise of human rights and marketplace competition, but patents are being used to lock up vital educational, software, genetic and other information, creating a global property order dominated by a multinational elite. How did intellectual property rules become part of the World Trade Organization's free trade agreements? How have these rules changed the knowledge game for international business? What are the consequences for the ownership of biotechnology and digital technology, and for all those who have to pay for what was once shared information? Based on extensive interviews with key players, this book tells the story of these profound transformations in information ownership. The authors argue that in the globalized information society, the rich have found new ways to rob the poor, and shows how intellectual property rights can be more democratically defined.
  

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Review: Information Feudalism: Who Owns the Knowledge Economy?

User Review  - Kim - Goodreads

On one hand, some of the info about certain legislation is out of date. On the other hand, with the TPP and revisions to DMCA, the information about how these processes work and how corporations and government instill a state of contemporary feudalism, is as important as ever. Read full review

Review: Information Feudalism: Who Owns the Knowledge Economy?

User Review  - elizabeth - Goodreads

this book is amazing... the author spent years interviewing people who negotiated treaties that have impacted the economy of information, and essentially determine who can have access to what ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Piracy
19
The Knowledge Game
39
Stealing from the Mind
61
The Illusion of Sovereignty
74
The Bilaterals
85
Agendas and Agendasetters The Multilateral Game
108
Persuasion and Principles
121
Biogopolies
150
Infogopolies
169
Democratic Property Rights
187
Resisting the New Inequality
198
On the Importance of the Publicness of Knowledge
210
Notes
220
Index
243
Copyright

At the Negotiating Table
133

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About the author (2002)

Peter Drahos and John Braithwaite are both professors in the Australian National University, Canberra, and Co-authors of Global Business Regulation.

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