The Rise of the Novel: Studies in Defoe, Richardson and Fielding

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University of California Press, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 339 pages
6 Reviews
Praise for the new (2001) edition:

"Ian Watt's The Rise of the Novel still seems to me far and away the best book ever written on the early English novel--wise, humane, beautifully organized and expressed, one of the absolutely indispensable critical works in modern literary scholarship. And W. B. Carnochan's brilliant introduction does a wonderful job of showing how Watt's book came into being and changed for good the way the novel in general is taught and understood."--Max Byrd, author of Grant: A Novel

"Ian Watt's The Rise of the Novel remains the single indispensable, absolutely essential book for students of the 18th-century novel."--John Richetti, author of The English Novel in History: 1700-1780

Praise for the original edition:

"A remarkable book. . . . A pioneer work in the application of modern sociology to literature."--Manchester Guardian

"An outstanding contribution to the field of historical sociology and the sociology of knowledge. . . . The author has set the 'rise of the novel' as a new literary genre in the social context of eighteenth-century England, with emphasis on the predominant middle-class features of the period."--American Journal of Sociology
  

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Review: The Rise of the Novel

User Review  - Paul - Goodreads

Terrific introduction to the early novels, very readable ... Read full review

Review: The Rise of the Novel

User Review  - Ehtishamulhaq - Goodreads

i read this book Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Realism and the novel form
9
The reading public and the rise of the novel
35
Robinson Crusoe individualism and the novel
60
Defoe as novelist Moll Flanders
93
Love and the novel Pamela
135
Private experience and the novel
174
Richardson as novelist Clarissa
208
Fielding and the epic theory of the novel
239
Fielding as novelist Tom Jones
260
Realism and the later tradition a note
290
Afterword
303
Index
323
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Ian Watt (1917-1999) was Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of English at Stanford University. W. B. Carnochan is Richard W. Lyman Professor of the Humanities Emeritus at Stanford, where he was a colleague of Ian Watt's for many years.

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