Black Leaders of the Twentieth Century

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John Hope Franklin, August Meier
University of Illinois Press, Jan 1, 1982 - Biography & Autobiography - 372 pages
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Chapters on Booker T. Washington, T. Thomas Fortune, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, W.E.B Dubois, James Weldon Johnson, Marcus Garvey, A. Philip Randolph, Charles C. Spaulding, Mary McLeod Bethune, Charles H. Houston, Mabel K. Staupers, Adams Clayton Powell, Jr., Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Whitney M. Young, Jr.
  

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Contents

BOOKER T WASHINGTON AND THE POLITICS OF ACCOMMODATION
1
T THOMAS FORTUNE MILITANT EDITOR IN THE AGE OF ACCOMMODATION
19
THE LONELY WARRIOR IDA B WELLSBARNETT AND THE STRUGGLE FOR BLACK LEADERSHIP
39
WEB DU BOIS PROTAGONIST OF THE AFROAMERICAN PROTEST
63
JAMES WELDON JOHNSON AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NAACP
85
MARCUS GARVEY AND THE POLITICS OF REVITALIZATION
105
A PHILIP RANDOLPH LABOR LEADER AT LARGE
139
CHARLES CLINTON SPAULDING MIDDLECLASS LEADERSHIP IN THE AGE OF SEGREGATION
167
CHARLES HAMILTON HOUSTON SOCIAL ENGINEER FOR CIVIL RIGHTS
221
MABEL K STAUPERS AND THE INTEGRATION OF BLACK NURSES INTO THE ARMED FORCES
241
ADAM CLAYTON POWELL JR THE MILITANT AS POLITICIAN
259
MARTIN LUTHER KING JR AND THE PROMISE OF NONVIOLENT
277
MALCOLM X WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION
305
WHITNEY M YOUNG JR COMMITTING THE POWER STRUCTURE TO THE CAUSE OF CIVIL RIGHTS
331
NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS
359
INDEX
361

MARY MCLEOD BETHUNE AND THE NATIONAL YOUTH ADMINISTRATION A CASE STUDY OF POWER RELATIONSHIPS IN THE BLA...
191

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About the author (1982)

The son of an attorney who practiced before the U.S. Supreme Court, John Hope Franklin was born in Rentiesville, Oklahoma on January 2, 1915. He received a B. A. from Fisk University in 1935 and a master's degree in 1936 and a Ph.D. in 1941 from Harvard University. During his career in education, he taught at a numerous institutions including Brooklyn College, Harvard University, the University of Chicago, and Duke University. He also had teaching stints in Australia, China, and Zimbabwe. He has written numerous scholarly works including The Militant South, 1800-1861 (1956); Reconstruction After the Civil War (1961); The Emancipation Proclamation (1963); and The Color Line: Legacy for the 21st Century (1993). His comprehensive history From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African-Americans (1947) is generally acknowledged to be the basic survey of African American history. He received numerous awards during his lifetime including the Medal of Freedom in 1995 and the John W. Kluge Prize for the Study of Humanities in 2006. He worked with Thurgood Marshall's team of lawyers in their effort to end segregation in the 1954 case Brown v. Board of Education and participated in the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He was president of the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the Southern Historical Association, and the American Studies Association. He was also a founding member of the Black Academy of Arts and served on the U.S. Commission for UNESCO and the Committee on International Exchange of Scholars. He died of congestive heart failure on March 25, 2009 at the age of 94.

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