Miscellaneous essays. Political tracts. A journey to the Western Islands of Scotland (Google eBook)

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T. Longman, 1792
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Page 254 - and diverted ourfelves as the place gave us opportunity. I fat down on a bank, fuch as a writer of romance might have delighted to feign. I had indeed no trees to whifper over my head, but a clear rivulet ftreamed at my feet. The day was calm, the air
Page 360 - to plead for their eafy reception of an improbable fiction: they -are feduced by their fondnefs for their fuppofed anceftors. A Scotchman muft be a very fturdy moralift, who does not love Scotland better than truth; he will always love it better than enquiry : and if falfehood flatters his vanity, will not be very diligent to
Page 46 - of an ague, and good fport it is to fee a man tumble with an epilepfy, and revive and tumble again, and all this he knows not why. As they are wifer and more powerful than we, they have more exquifite diverfions, for we have no way of procuring any fport fo
Page 355 - and confidered little, and do not always feel their own ignorance. They are not much accuftomed to be interrogated by others ; and feem never to have thought upon interrogating themfelves; fo that if they do not know what they tell to be true, they likewife do not diftinctly perceive it to be falfe. Mr.
Page 122 - gafping and groaning, unpitied among men, made obdurate by long continuance of hopelefs mifery ; and were at laft whelmed in pits, or heaved into the ocean, without notice and without remembrance. By incommodious encampments and unwholefome ftations, where courage is ufelefs, and enterprife
Page 142 - moment of opportunity, and catch the good that is within our reach, is the great art of life. Many wants are fuffered, which might once have been fupplied; and much time is loft in regretting the time which had been loft before. At the end of every
Page 254 - and found a wider bafis of analogy. Regions mountainous and wild, thinly inhabited, and little cultivated, make a great part of the earth, and he that has never feen them, muft live unacquainted with much of the face of nature, and with one of the great fcenes of human exiftence.
Page 288 - the winds and waters, fills the imagination with a delightful contrariety of images. Without is the rough ocean and the rocky land, the beating billows and the howling ftorm : within is plenty and elegance, beauty and gaiety, the fong and the dance. In Raafay, if I could have found an Ulyjes,
Page 344 - incidents. A gentleman told me, that when he had once gone far from his own ifland, one of his labouring fervants predicted his return, and defcribed the livery of his attendant, which he had never worn at home; and which had been, without any previous defign, occafionally given him. Our defire of information was keen,
Page 344 - the livery of his attendant, which he had never worn at home; and which had been, without any previous defign, occafionally given him. Our defire of information was keen, and our inquiry frequent. Mr. Bofwell's franknefs and gaiety made every body communicative; and we heard many tales of thefe airy fhows, with more or

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