Plowshares and pork barrels: the political economy of agriculture

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Independent Institute, Sep 1, 2005 - Business & Economics - 384 pages
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Agricultural subsidies in grains, cotton, milk, sugar, tobacco, honey, wool, and peanuts are analyzed in this examination of U.S. farm policy. Looking at such programs as food stamps, crop insurance, subsidized credit, trade credit, trade subsidies and import restrictions, conservation, agricultural research, and taxation, this historical perspective argues that these subsidies ultimately redistribute wealth to powerful agricultural interests who use their political clout to advance their economic interests at the expense of the general public. This analysis of government farm programs will appeal to professors and students who study agriculture; people affected by government farm policies; public officials, and businesses affected by agricultural policy such as those in food service, retail, and distribution.

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Contents

Economic Efficiency and Equity in U S Agriculture
13
Private versus
23
The Economics of the Political Process
37
Copyright

19 other sections not shown

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About the author (2005)

E. C. Pasour, Jr., is a professor of business and economics at North Carolina State University and the author of Agriculture and the State. He lives in Raleigh, North Carolina. Randall R. Rucker is a professor of agricultural economics at Montana State University. He lives in Bozeman, Montana. Bruce L. Gardner is the former assistant secretary for economics in the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the dean of the college of agriculture at the University of Maryland. He lives in College Park, Maryland.