Historical Sketches and Reminiscences of Madison County, Indiana: A Detailed History of the Early Events of the Pioneer Settlement of the County, and Many of the Happenings of Recent Years, as Well as a Complete History of Each Township, to which is Added Numerous Incidents of a Pleasant Nature, in the Way of Reminiscences, and Laughable Occurrences (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Forkner, 1897 - Madison County (Ind.) - 1038 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 170 - No Senator or Member of Assembly, shall, during the term for which he shall have been elected, be appointed to any civil office of profit under this State, which shall have been created, or the emoluments of which shall have been increased during such term, except such offices as may be filled by elections by the people.
Page 771 - Indians commenced their seasons hunting and trapping the men with their guns, and the squaws setting the traps, preparing and cooking the game, and caring for the children two boys, some ten years old, and two girls of more tender years. A week had rolled around, and the success of the Indians had been very fair, with better prospects ahead, as the spring was opening, and racoons were beginning to leave their holes in the trees in search of frogs that had begun to leave their muddy beds at...
Page 779 - The only remaining case of the stripling, Bridge, Jr., for the murder of the other Indian boy at the camp came on next. The trial was more brief, but the result was the same verdict of murder in the first degree...
Page 774 - Johnston, the Indian agent, was directed to attend the trials to see that the witnesses were present and to pay their fees. Gen. James Noble, then a United States senator, was employed by the secretary of war to prosecute, with power to fee an assistant. Philip Sweetzer, a young son-in-law of the general, of high promise in his profession, was selected by the general as his assistant; Calvin Fletcher was the regular prosecuting attorney, then a young man of more than ordinary ability, and a good...
Page 776 - ... guilty." The petit jury were hardy, honest pioneers, wearing moccasins and side knives. The evidence occupied but a single day, and was positive, closing every door of hope to the prisoner. The prosecuting attorney read the statute creating and affixing the punishment to the homicide, and plainly stated the substance of the evidence. He was followed for the prisoner, in able, eloquent, and powerful speeches, appealing to the prejudice of the jury against the Indians; relating in glowing colors...
Page 781 - He threw his eyes around upon the audience and then down upon the coffins, where lay exposed the bodies of his father and uncle. From that moment his wild gaze too clearly showed that the scene had been too much for his youthful mind. Reason had partially left her throne and he stood wildly looking at the crowd, apparently unconscious of his position. The last minute had come, when James Brown Ray, the Governor of the State, announced to the immense assemblage that the convict was pardoned. Never...
Page 773 - A new log building was erected at the north part of Pendleton, with two rooms, one for the court and the other for the grand jury. The court room was about twenty by thirty feet with a heavy
Page 772 - Sen., shot another squaw, and Bridge, Jr., the other squaw. Both fell dead. Sawyer then fired at the oldest boy, but only wounded him. The other children were shot by some of the party. Harper then led on to the camp. The three squaws, one boy, and the two little girls lay dead, but the oldest boy was still living. Sawyer took him by the legs, and knocked his brains out against the end of a log. The camp was then robbed of everything worth carrying away. Harper, the ring leader, left immediately...
Page 780 - An hour expired. The bodies were taken down and laid in their coffins, when there was seen ascending the scaffold, Bridge, Jr., the last of the convicts. His ste'p was feeble, requiring the aid of the sheriff. The rope was adjusted. He threw his eyes around upon the audience, and then down upon the coffins, where lay exposed the bodies of his father and uncle. From that moment, his wild gaze too clearly showed that the scene had been too much for his youthful mind. Reason had partially left her...
Page 774 - blessing " at the table Mr. Fletcher declining. The Judge hud killed a fat goose for the extraordinary occasion, which was nicely stuffed with well-seasoned bread and onions, and placed in the center of the table. Mr. Wick, who was not a church member, fixed his eye upon the goose and said, by way of compliment " That is a damned fine goose, Judge.

Bibliographic information