Highland Peoples of New Guinea

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CUP Archive, Jun 30, 1978 - Social Science - 258 pages
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Fifty years ago the New Guinea highlands were isolated and unknown to outsiders. As the highland peoples of New Guinea are among the last large groups to be brought into the world community, they are of major interest to ecologists, social anthropologists and cultural historians. This study synthesises previous anthropological research on the New Guinea highland peoples and cultures and demonstrates the interrelations of ecological adaptation, population and society. In describing, analysing and comparing the technology, culture and community life of peoples of the highland and the highland fringe, Professor Brown shows the special character of these societies, which have developed in isolation. In addition to examining the unique regional development of the New Guinea highland peoples, this book, a study in ecological and social anthropology, brings together theses two analytical fields and demonstrates their interrelationships.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
LIFE IN THE HIGHLAND HABITAT
16
AGRICULTURE AND POPULATION
66
LAND AND LOCALITY
113
FAMILY AND KINSHIP
144
COHESION AND COMPETITION
182
Conclusion
234
References
246
Copyright

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About the author (1978)

Paula Brown, Animal Communicator and Feng Shui Practitioner, runs her own communications practice, The Heart of Conversation (Bird in Hand). She regularly takes referrals from around the world and works as a guest lecturer for holistic and alternative healing organizations, as well as teaches animal communications workshops. Her Web site is www.animalheartalk.com. She lives in Encinitas, California.

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