The Life and Poems of Theodore Winthrop (Google eBook)

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H. Holt, 1884 - 313 pages
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I own Laura Winthrop Johnson's copy of this book (Theodore's sister who edited the book). On the last page she has penciled in a table of errata, listing page numbers. Some are corrections, some aren't obvious as to what was intended. I think if there had been another printing they might have made these corrections. There may be other corrections through the book that haven't been added to the table.
Pages:
6 - Asterisk at the end of the first paragraph, at the bottom of the page is written in her script what I think reads "Hartford" but the spelling might be different?
15 - Lines 18-22 - Vertical line in right margin. Not sure what was intended. Maybe strike the end of the paragraph?
68 - Line 5 - 'methinks' should be 'Methinks'
157? - Nothing marked on page 157, the question marks is also in the table.
228 - Line 5 - 'sympathy' should be 'symphony'
230 - Line 17 - 'emboding' should be 'embodying'
261 - Line 6 - 'Rungely' should be 'Rangley'
284 - No marks on page 284...
301 - In the footnote 'Seven Pines' is crossed out and Five Forks penciled in.
307 - 'Elensis' should be 'Eleusis'
One of these days (when I make time) I will the bibliographic information in the book about him.
 

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Page 298 - ... as never other wore, And letting thy set lips, Freed from wrath's pale eclipse, The rosy edges of their smile lay bare, What words divine of lover or of poet Could tell our love and make thee know it, Among the Nations bright beyond compare? What were our lives without thee? What all our lives to save thee ? We reck not what we gave thee ; We will not dare to doubt thee, But ask whatever else, and we will dare!
Page 297 - O brother ! if thine eye can see, Tell how and when the end shall be, What hope remains for thee and me." Then Freedom sternly said : "I shun No strife nor pang beneath the sun, When human rights are staked and won.
Page 298 - O Beautiful ! my Country ! ours once more ! Smoothing thy gold of war-dishevelled hair O'er such sweet brows as never other wore, And letting thy set lips, Freed from wrath's pale eclipse, The rosy edges of their smile lay bare, What words divine of lover or of poet Could tell our love and make thee know it, Among the Nations bright beyond compare ? What were our lives without thee ? What all our lives to save thee ? We reck not what we gave thee ; We will not dare to doubt thee, But ask whatever...
Page 158 - And in all that period while I was so near to Nature, the great lessons of the wilderness deepened into my heart day by day, the hedges of conventionalism withered away from my horizon, and all the pedantries of scholastic thought perished out of my mind forever.
Page 165 - mid tempest and wrath, Breezes are skirmishing, angry winds roar ; While poised on some desperate plunge of our path, We count up the blackening wrecks on the shore.
Page 166 - Or when ships plunge onward where night-clouds loom, Defiant of darkness and meeting its frown. These are the days of motion and march ; Now we are ardent, and young, and brave : Let them that come after us build the arch Of our triumph, and plant with the laurel our grave. Time enough to rear temples when heroes are dead, Time enough to sing paeans after the fight : Prophets urge onward the future's tread ; We, we are to kindle its beacon-light.
Page 167 - Prophets urge onward the future's tread ; We, we, are to kindle, its beacon-light. Our sires lit torches of quenchless flame To illumine our darkness, if night should be ; But day is a friend to our standards, and shame Be ours, if we win not a victory ! Man is nobler than men have been, Souls are vaster than souls have dreamed ; There are broader oceans than eyes have seen, Noons more glowing than yet have beamed. Creeping shadows cower low on our land ; These shall not dim our grander day :...
Page 290 - ... use." In this spirit he acted, and such was his evident ability that in a month he was aid and military secretary to General Butler, and held at his disposal a first lieutenancy in the army. He lost his life in the expedition that left Fort Monroe. June 9, 1861, at Bethel, the rebel riflemen stating that they several times took deliberate aim at him, as he was all the time conspicuous at the head of the advancing Federal troops, loudly cheering them on to the assault He was shot in the side.
Page 130 - The general tone is bricky and dusty, almost all the new buildings being substantial fireproof brick of one story. It may safely be called the dirtiest place in the world. "A single day will transform it from a slough, navigable only in a pair of gaff-topsail boots, to an ankle-deep dustpan ; and when you consider that besides the immense street traffic, there is hardly a half block where they are not cutting, or filling, or building, or pulling down, you may imagine that the springy plank pavements...
Page 292 - ... Colonel Townsend's cooperation, when this plan was defeated by the gross blunder of whoever was in command of Townsend's left a captain I believe in allowing three companies to become detached from the main body by a thicket. From this circumstance Townsend, as he was proceeding to the attack, was led to believe, as he saw the bayonets of his own men glistening through the foliage, that he was outflanked. Ho retreated, and that was the end of the battle.

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