The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Volume 9 (Google eBook)

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1823 - Science
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Contains the proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the Wernerian Natural History Society, etc
  

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Page 208 - A description and draught of a new invented Machine, for carrying Vessels or Ships out of, or into, any Harbour, Port, or River, against Wind and Tide, or in a Calm...
Page 17 - He was able to measure the thickness of the bed of snow over the stream very accurately by means of a plumb-line let down through one of the holes in it, which are caused by the steam of a great number of boiling springs at the border of the Jumna, the thickness 40 feet 5 inches.
Page 41 - Th' ethereal dome, in mournful pomp array 'd, Now lurks behind impenetrable shade ; Now, flashing round intolerable light, Redoubles all the terrors of the night. Such terror Sinai's quaking hill o'erspread, When Heaven's loud trumpet sounded o'er its head. It seem'd the wrathful angel of...
Page 40 - ... light, completely embracing the circumference of the mast, and attended with a flitting or creeping motion, as exemplified experimentally by the application of common phosphorus upon a board ; and the fore and mizen top-gallant-mast-heads exhibited a similar appearance in a relative degree. This curious illumination continued with undiminished intensity for the space of eight or ten minutes, when, becoming gradually fainter and less extensive, it finally disappeared, after a duration of not less...
Page 19 - Jumna, on the SW side of the grand Himalaya ridge, differing from the Ganges, inasmuch as that river has the upper part of its course within the Himalaya, flowing from the south of east to the north of west ; and it is only from iSuchi, where it pierces through the Himalaya, that it assumes a course of about south 20 west.
Page 181 - ... like pumice stone, only, it has the whiteness of porcelain, graduating however into light grey, and other shades, as it recedes from the intense heat. In a few instances I obtained upon the charcoal, when this substance terminated both poles, distinct, limpid spheres, and at other times they adhered to the frit like beads on a string. Had we not been encouraged by the remarkable facts already stated, it would appear very extravagant to ask whether this white frit and these limpid spheres could...
Page 382 - ... dropped into the fluid instantly made it boil, from the heat communicated by it. To prove in an unexceptionable manner that the fluid was pure sulphurous acid, some sulphurous acid gas was carefully prepared over mercury, and a long tube perfectly dry, and closed at one end, being exhausted, was filled with it ; more sulphurous acid was then thrown in by a condensing syringe, till there were three or four atmospheres ; the tube remained perfectly clear and dry...
Page 382 - Much stronger lubes are however required for carbonic acid than for any of the former substances, and there is none which has produced so many or more powerful explosions. Tubes which have held fluid carbonic acid well for two or three weeks together, have, upon some increase in the warmth of the weather, spontaneously exploded with great violence ; and the precautions of glass masks, goggles, &c. which are at all times necessary in pursuing these experiments, are particularly so with carbonic acid....
Page 178 - Bolton and Watt. By this means, as much low pressure steam of four pounds on the square inch may be generated by one bushel of. coals, as could be produced in the old engine by nine bushels. This most important result, was obtained by actual experiment. Since these great improvements have been...
Page 276 - LL are teeth for a catch to drop in from the axis, and are so contrived, that they catch in an alternate manner, to cause the fans to move always forward, for the wheel...

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