Bartók's Chamber Music

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Pendragon Press, 1994 - Music - 508 pages
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 At first sight a work devoted to Bartók's chamber music looks as though it were simply concerned with a genre division attempting an exposition of no more than a single aspect of the whole oeuvre. But in Bartók's case the chamber music is not simply a matter of grouping according to genre-it is really the framework for his whole oeuvre. (From the introduction) "János Kárpáti one of the outstanding scholars in the field of Bartók research here presents a revised and expanded edition of his Bartók's String Quartets (Corvina Press 1975)."

  

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Contents

The Place of Chamber Music in Bartoks Oeuvre
1
MUSICAL IDIOM AND STYLE
19
The Legacy of Beethoven
21
Forerunners and Contemporaries
31
The Folk Music Influence
81
Monothematicism and Variation
129
Polymodal Chromaticism
169
Tonality and PolytonalityThe Phenomenon of Mistuning
185
Early Chamber Works
239
The First String Quartet
249
The Second String Quartet
269
The Two Sonatas for Violin and Piano
289
The Third String Quartet
321
The Fourth String Quartet
339
The Fifth String Quartet
365
Source List of the Works Quoted
493

ANALYSES
237

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (1994)

 János Kárpáti (born 1932, Budapest), Hungarian musicologist, professor and head librarian of the Liszt Academy (University) of Music, Budapest from 1961 till 2005. He studied at the same institution with Zoltán Kodály, Bence Szabolcsi and Dénes Bartha, took his PhD in 1968 and DSc in 1995. He collected folk music in Morocco (1958) and in Japan (1988, 1994). He cooperated with several international projects (Unesco–East–West, Music in the Life of Man), and served 1980–1986 as vice president of the International Association of Music Libraries. From1998 till 2006 chaired the Hungarian Musicological Society. His main research fields in musicology are: Bartók analysis, and Japanese traditional music. He lectured at several universities in the USA, Canada, Japan, South Korea, France, Italy. He represented Hungary at several international conferences (Tehran, New Delhi, Florence, Tokyo, Osaka, Detroit, Washington, Los Angeles). He was decorated by the Erkel Prize (1971), the Grand Prize of Hungarian Creative Artists (1991), the Award for Excellence of the American Liszt Society (1996), the Széchenyi Prize, József Eötvös Wreath (2005).

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