The Catholic Counterculture in America, 1933-1962

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UNC Press Books, Feb 1, 2001 - Religion - 324 pages
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James Fisher argues that Catholic culture was transformed when products of the "immigrant church," largely inspired by converts like Dorothy Day, launched a variety of spiritual, communitarian, and literary experiments. He also explores the life and works
  

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Contents

The Conversion of Dorothy Day
1
Fools for Christ Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Movement 19331949
25
The Catholic Workers and Catholic Culture 19331949
71
The Limits of Personalism Integrity and the Marycrest Community 19461956
101
Thomas A Dooley and the Romance of Catholic Anticommunism
131
A Catholic Errand in the Wilderness Tom Dooley in Laos and America 19561961
167
Jack Kerouac and Thomas Merton the Last Catholic Romantics
205
Epilogue
249
Notes
255
Bibliography
283
Index
299
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About the author (2001)

James Terence Fisher is the Danforth Chair in Humanities and Professor in Theological Studies and History at Saint Louis University. His other works include Dr. America: The Lives of Thomas A. Dooley, 1927-1961.

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