The popular works of Johann Gottlieb Fichte, tr., with a memoir of the author by W. Smith (Google eBook)

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Page 88 - The One remains, the many change and pass : Heaven's light for ever shines, Earth's shadows fly ; Life, like a dome of many-coloured glass, Stains the white radiance of Eternity, Until Death tramples it to fragments.
Page 167 - The cold, colossal, adamantine spirit, standing erect and clear, like a Cato Major among degenerate men; fit to have been the teacher of the Stoa, and to have discoursed of Beauty and Virtue in the groves of Academe!
Page 470 - Not for idle contemplation of thyself, not for brooding over devout sensations ; no, for action art thou here ; thine action, and thine action alone, determines thy worth.
Page 40 - I am now thoroughly convinced that the human will is free, and that to be happy is not the purpose of our being, but to deserve happiness.
Page 132 - In the progress of my present work, I have taken a deeper glance into religion than ever I did before. In me the emotions of the heart proceed only from perfect intellectual clearness ; it cannot be but that the clearness I have now attained on this subject shall also take possession of my heart.
Page 269 - ... joy and blessedness flow in upon his soul. And it lies in the Divine Idea that all men must come to this gladdening consciousness that the outward and tasteless Finite Life may be pervaded by the Infinite, and so enjoyed...
Page 303 - ... becomes impossible for him to live without employment. Lastly, everything is vulgar and ignoble which robs man of respect for himself, of faith in himself, and of the power of reckoning with confidence upon himself and his purposes. Nothing is more destructive of character than for man to lose all faith in his own resolutions because he has so often determined, and again determined, to do that which nevertheless he has never done. Then he feels it necessary to...
Page 65 - Every judgment, however expressed, I shall thankfully acknowledge ; every objection which seems incompatible with the cause of truth, I shall meet as well as I can. To truth I solemnly devote myself, at this my first entrance into public life. Without respect of party or of reputation, I shall always acknowledge that to be truth which I recognise as such, come whence it may ; and never acknowledge that which I do not believe. The public will pardon me for having thus spoken of myself, on this first...
Page 154 - Who can know what great deeds, what excellent in' stitutions, what noble manners of many nations of ' antiquity may have past away into oblivion, because ' their succeeding generations have been enslaved, and ' have left the conqueror, in his own way, and without ' contradiction, to tell their story...
Page 536 - Thou art, and seemest to Thine own being, I can never know, any more than I can assume Thy nature. After thousands upon thousands of spirit-lives, I shall comprehend Thee as little as I do now in this earthly house. That which I conceive. becomes finite through my very conception of it : and this...

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