Bulletin, Issue 47 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
The Survey, 1916 - Geology
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Page 82 - The following table gives the average dates of the last killing frosts in the spring and the first in the fall at various stations within the survey and also at Madison, Wisconsin.
Page 57 - This organic matter is largely in the form of leaf-mold and fine roots and is hence of an active character so that it decomposes quickly when the surface is first broken, furnishing a sufficient supply of nitrogen for a good growth of crops for a few years. It however, is exhausted with comparative readiness and the most important point in the management of all of these soils is to follow methods which will maintain and increase the organic matter. In the virgin condition these soils are but slightly...
Page 26 - ... pasture. Seeding clover in corn at the last cultivation will secure good growth when the season is favorable. Cultivated ground when used for pasture should not be grazed closely. Nitrogen is perhaps the most essential element of plant food and large amounts are used by all crops. It exists only in...
Page 13 - ... the Ohio river and the valleys in places are a half mile or more in width. The bottoms are all subject to overflow, and the soil found there, though rather variable in texture, is a loam having the characteristics of the Huntington loam.
Page 57 - They have a correspondingly low nitrogen content averaging from a thousand to 1500 pounds in the surface 8 inches and from 500 to 800 pounds in the second 8 inches. This organic matter is largely in the form of leaf-mold and fine roots and is hence of an active character so that it decomposes quickly when the surface is first broken, furnishing a sufficient supply of nitrogen for a good growth of crops for a few years.
Page 65 - ... capacity. This depends chiefly on the texture or fineness of grain and cannot be affected by any treatment it is practicable to give them. The water-holding capacity can be somewhat increased by increasing the amount of organic matter, but this is a comparatively slow process and the amount of organic matter it is practicable to develop and maintain in these soils will increase their water-holding capacity only to a limited extent. The total content of the essential elements of plant food in...
Page 80 - Among the factors which influence the agriculture of a state none is more important than climate. The class of crops which can be grown is largely determined by the length of the growing season, and the amount and distribution of the rainfall." Any one of these factors may determine the type of farming which can be followed to best advantage. "The distribution of rainfall over Wisconsin is remarkably uniform, the average yearly precipitation having a range of from 28 to 34 inches, while the mean...
Page 80 - ... from April to September, inclusive. June has the heaviest rainfall, averaging 4.1 inches, while July averages 4 inches and May 3.9 inches. The precipitation during the winter, on the other hand is slight; December, January, and February each averaging from 1 to 1.5 inches of rain and melted snow. The average rainfall for the state during the winter is 3.9 inches, during spring 8.3 inches, during summer 11.4 inches and during autumn 7.4 inches.
Page 58 - It is often desirable to use the commercial fertilizers containing phosphorus and potassium in order to secure a good growth of this clover, and there is little loss in so doing, since essentially all of the phosphorus and potassium applied to the soil for the clover becomes available to the succeeding crop through the decomposition of the organic matter. The use of lime in some form and also the inoculation of the soil is of the utmost importance when alfalfa is to be grown, and will be found helpful...
Page 74 - ... satisfactory. Yields of 50 bushels per acre are very common. Statistics show that corn is the third crop in importance from the standpoint of acreage. As dairying increases the number of silos also increases. This calls for an increased acreage of corn. Golden Glow, Wisconsin No. 12, and Wisconsin No. 8 are early dent varieties which are being grown successfully in addition to the native yellow dent corn of mixed breeding. Flint corn is also quite commonly grown. Throughout the southern portion...

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