The Quest of the Silver Fleece (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Nov 1, 2007 - Literary Collections - 336 pages
6 Reviews
First published in 1911, The Quest of the Silver Fleece is set in Washington, D.C., and Alabama. The silver fleece refers to the cotton industry, owned by powerful white men, who continued to make their fortune through the labor of African-Americans. In the story, Blessed Alwyn tries to come to terms with how a black man can integrate into society. He gets an education and moves to Washington, where he meets well-to-do blacks who seem to be living the kind of lives slaves had struggled for. Only, Blessed comes to find out, they have to make many compromises in order to be accepted by their white neighbors. Anyone with an interest in race relations and life at the turn of the 20th century will find this book about economics, race, love, and the hero's quest an astute sociological study. American writer, civil rights activist, and scholar WILLIAM EEDWARD BURGHARDT DUBOIS (1868-1963) was the first black man to receive a PhD from Harvard University. A cofounder of the NAACP, he wrote a number of important books, including The Philadelphia Negro (1899), Black Folk, Then and Now (1899), and The Negro (1915).
  

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Review: The Quest of the Silver Fleece: A Novel

User Review  - Gina - Goodreads

I first learned of this book via Slavery By Another Name. DuBois had studied the area and written a report, and then could not publish it as sociology, so turned it into a novel. It starts off ... Read full review

Review: The Quest of the Silver Fleece: A Novel

User Review  - Mary Robinette Kowal - Goodreads

Everyone should read this book. It's a wonderful coming of age story set in the early 1900s. Beautifully written. Read full review

Contents

II
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III
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IV
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V
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VI
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VII
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VIII
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IX
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XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XV
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XXI
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XXX
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXIV
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XXXV
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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Copyright

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Page 14 - He heard her voice as before, fluttering like a bird's in the full sweetness of her utter music. It was no tune nor melody, it was just formless, boundless music. The boy forgot himself and all the world besides. All his darkness was sudden light; dazzled he crept forward, bewildered, fascinated, until with one last wild whirl the elf-girl paused.
Page 14 - Amid this mighty halo, as on clouds of flame, a girl was dancing. She was black, and lithe, and tall, and willowy. Her garments twined and flew around the delicate moulding of her dark, young, half-naked limbs. A heavy mass of hair clung motionless to her wide forehead. Her arms twirled and nickered, and body and soul seemed quivering and whirring in the poetry of her motion.
Page 11 - He who would tell a tale must look toward three ideals: to tell it well, to tell it beautifully, and to tell the truth. The first is the Gift of God, the second is the Vision of Genius, but the third is the Reward of Honesty. In The Quest of the Silver Fleece there is little, I ween, divine or ingenious; but, at least, I have been honest. In no fact or picture have I consciously set down aught the counterpart of which I have not seen or known...
Page 40 - No, no. They don't really rule; they just thinks they rule. They just got things heavy, dead things. We black folks is got the spirit, We'se lighter and cunninger, we fly right through them; we go and come again just as we wants to. Black folks is wonderful.
Page 16 - She clapped her hands in glee. "Is there any water near?" he asked. Without a word, she bounded up and flitted off like a brown bird, gleaming dull-golden in the sun, glancing in and out among the trees, till she paused above a tiny black pool, and then came tripping and swaying back with hands held cupwise and dripping with cool water. "Drink,
Page 16 - And we'll be friends always, won't we?" "Yes," she said at last, slowly and solemnly, and another brief moment they stood still. Then the mischief danced in her eyes, and a song bubbled on her lips. She hopped to the tree. "Come eat!

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About the author (2007)

Civil rights leader and author, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts on February 23, 1868. He earned a B.A. from both Harvard and Fisk universities, an M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard, and studied at the University of Berlin. He taught briefly at Wilberforce University before he came professor of history and economics at Atlanta University in Ohio (1896-1910). There, he wrote The Souls of Black Folk (1903), in which he pointed out that it was up to whites and blacks jointly to solve the problems created by the denial of civil rights to blacks. In 1905, Du Bois became a major figure in the Niagara Movement, a crusading effort to end discrimination. The organization collapsed, but it prepared the way for the founding of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), in which Du Bois played a major role. In 1910, he became editor of the NAACP magazine, a position he held for more than 20 years. Du Bois returned to Atlanta University in 1932 and tried to implement a plan to make the Negro Land Grant Colleges centers of black power. Atlanta approved of his idea, but later retracted its support. When Du Bois tried to return to NAACP, it rejected him too. Active in several Pan-African Congresses, Du Bois came to know Fwame Nkrumah, the first president of Ghana, and Jono Kenyatta the president of Kenya. In 1961, the same year Du Bois joined the Communist party, Nkrumah invited him to Ghana as a director of an Encyclopedia Africana project. He died there on Aug. 27, 1963, after becoming a citizen of that country.

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