Notes and observations on the Ionian Islands and Malta: with some remarks on Constantinople and Turkey, and on the system of quarantine as at present conducted, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Smith, Elder, 1842 - History
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Page 22 - Hugged it is, not yielding level course To the swift steed, and yet no barren spot, However small, but rich in wheat and wine ; Nor wants it rain or fertilizing dew, But pasture green to goats and beeves affords, Trees of all kinds, and fountains never dry.
Page 164 - This phenomenon occurs in Cephalonia, about a mile and a half from the town of Argostoli, near the entrance of the harbour, where the shore is composed of freestone, and is low and cavernous from the action of the waves. The descending streams of salt water...
Page 164 - The next phenomenon I have to mention is very extraordinary, and apparently contrary to the order of nature ; it is the flowing of the M'ater of the sea into the land, in currents or rivulets which descend and are lost in the bowels of the earth. This phenomenon occurs in Cephalonia, about a mile and a half from the town of Argostoli, near the entrance of the harbour, where the shore is composed of freestone, and is low and cavernous...
Page 21 - Phieacia's mighty king. Walls plated bright with brass, on either side, Stretch'd from the portal to the interior house, With azure cornice crown'd ; the doors were gold, Which shut the palace fast ; silver the posts, Rear'd on a brazen threshold ; and above, The lintels, silver, architrav'd with gold.
Page 330 - Indeed, nowhere is improvement in agriculture more necessary. An old-fashioned Zetland plough is a real curiosity. It had but one handle, or stilt, and a coulter, but no sock; it ripped the furrow, therefore, but did not throw it aside. When this precious machine was in motion, it was dragged by four little bullocks yoked a-breast, and as many ponies harnessed, or rather strung, to the plough by ropes and thongs of raw hide. One man went before walking backward, with his face to the bullocks, and...
Page 37 - That the island of Malta was merely a rock of a soft sand-stone, called tufa, about six or seven leagues long, and three or four broad : that the surface of the rock was scarcely covered with more than three or four feet of earth, which was likewise stony, and very unfit to grow corn...
Page 3 - NOTES AND OBSERVATIONS ON THE IONIAN ISLANDS AND MALTA, •WITH SOME REMARKS ON CONSTANTINOPLE AND TURKEY ; And on the system of Quarantine, as at present conducted. By JOHN DAVY, MD, FRSS. L. & E., Inspector-General of Army Hospitals, LR
Page 355 - ... may call a season, the olives from which the oil is pressed are collected as they ripen in winter and part of spring. It would seem that in almost every island the natives have a different way of expressing the oil, and that of natives of Cerigo, curious from its apparent antiquity, is as follows : the olives are placed on a nearly flat stone, and another heavy one of a square shape is rolled backwards and forwards on them, so as to press the fruit ; when thus bruised, the mass is put into a...
Page 113 - ... witness to the violent action of water, were observable on the opposite, or what may be called the convex side, the form of which might be described as resembling a portion of an inclined cylinder, or of a cone ; striped, as it was found to be, from top to bottom with deep longitudinal furrows, shewing that the direct downward rush of water must have taken place on this side, while on the opposite and concave side the rotatory action resulting from the contraction of the lower part of the rocky...
Page 223 - Smith sounded to the extraordinary depth of 950 fathoms (5,700 feet) where he found a gravelly bottom, with fragments of broken shells. Through these straits the current on the surface of the ocean sets constantly from the Atlantic into the Mediterranean, beneath the surface there is doubtless an under current from the Mediterranean into the Atlantic : this- idea is confirmed from the circumstance of a Dutch merchant ship being sunk by one broadside of a French...

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