Mark as Story: An Introduction to the Narrative of a Gospel

Front Cover
Fortress Press, 1999 - Religion - 176 pages
8 Reviews
Mark as Story has proved to be a useful resource for laypersons, students, and clergy for fifteen years. It introduces the Gospel of Mark as a unified composition, laying bare the narrative thread as well as the basic motifs. It is marked throughout by clarity, freshness, and a lively style.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - quantum_flapdoodle - LibraryThing

A good introduction to the Gospel of Mark as a narrative story. The authors apply the practice of literary analysis, and look at the storytelling narratives in the book of Mark. While the authors ... Read full review

Review: Mark as Story: An Introduction to the Narrative of a Gospel

User Review  - Rachel - Goodreads

Such a good read (I read the third edition). It helped me understand Mark in a fresh way, especially learning to think of it as a story to be told, not read. And that in Mark Jesus is not divine. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The Gospel of Mark
8
The Gospel of Mark
10
The Narrator
39
The narrator speaks from outside the story world
40
Marks narrator is fully omniscient
41
The narrator gives the reader privileged knowledge
42
The Narrators Point of View
43
The narrators standards of judgment
44
Jerusalem
92
Making faithful disciples
94
The resolution of the conflict
95
Conclusion
96
The Characters I Jesus
98
Characters as types
100
Standards of judgment
101
Comparison and contrast
102

The Narrators Style and Tempo
46
The Narrators Patterns of Repetition in Storytelling
47
Foreshadowing and retrospection
48
Twostep progressions
49
Typescenes
51
Framing episodes
52
Progressive episodes in series of three
54
Other Literary Features
55
Riddles
56
Quotations from the writings
58
Prophecies
59
Irony
60
Conclusion
61
The Settings
63
Cosmic Settings
64
The PoliticalCultural Setting
65
Journey
66
Gentile territory
67
The journey to Jerusalem
68
Settings recalling Israels past
69
The sea
70
The journey as the way of God
71
Conclusion
72
The Plot
73
Beginning middle and end
74
The fulfillment or nonfulfillment of expectations
75
The outcome of Marks plot
76
The plot involves conflict
77
The Rule of God Initiates the Conflicts
78
The inauguration of the rule of God
80
The culmination of the rule of God
81
Jesus in Conflict with Nonhuman Forces
82
Jesus in Conflict with the Authorities
84
The development of the conflict in the plot
85
The journey to Jerusalem
86
Defending Gods law
87
Message and evasion
88
The resolution of the conflict
89
Jesus in Conflict with the Disciples
90
The journey to Jerusalem
91
Identification with characters
103
Characterization
104
Agent of the rule of God
105
Faith
107
Renouncing self being least and losing life for others
109
Jesus faces death
110
The execution
111
The meaning of Jesus crucifixion
112
The empty grave
115
The Characters II The Authorities the Disciples and the People
116
No authority from God
117
Blind and deaf
118
Willful blindness
119
The authorities save themselves
120
Fear is at the root of their actions
121
The reader and the authorities
122
Characterization
123
Faith loyalty and authority
124
Lack of understanding fear and lack of faith
125
Fear and flight in Jerusalem
127
After the resurrection
128
The People
129
Characterization
130
Losing life being least and serving
131
Women
132
Comparison and contrast with other characters
133
The crowds
134
The reader and the minor characters
135
The Reader
137
Experiencing the rule of God
139
Facing persecution and execution in Jerusalem
140
The ending
142
Hypothetical FirstCentury Audiences
143
Contemporary Readers
146
Reading as a Dialogue The Ethics of Reading
147
Exercises for an Overall Literary Analysis of Mark
151
Exercises for a Narrative Analysis of Episodes
154
Notes
160
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

David Rhoads is emeritus Professor of New Testament at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. He is author of Reading Mark: Engaging the Gospel (2004). David Esterline is the Director of the Institute for Cross-Cultural Theological Education at McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago. He is the coeditor of The Handbook of Theological Education in World Christianity (2010). Jae Won Lee taught as Assistant Professor of New Testament at McCormick Theological Seminary in Chicago for eight years.

Joanna Dewey is Harvey H. Guthrie Jr. Professor Emerita of Biblical Studies at the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She has written numerous articles and is the author of Markan Public Debate (1980) and a coauthor of Mark as Story (3rd ed., 2012).

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