An Introduction to the Natural System of Botany: Or, A Systematic View of the Organization, Natural Affinities, and Geographical Distribution of the Whole Vegetable Kingdom; Together with the Uses of the Most Important Species in Medicine, the Arts, and Rural Or Domestic Economy (Google eBook)

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G. & C. & H. Carvill, 1831 - Botany - 392 pages
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Page 92 - One of the leaves slightly touched the first three fingers of my left hand : at the time I only perceived a slight pricking, to which I paid no attention. This was at seven in the morning. The pain continued to increase ; in an hour it had become intolerable : it seemed as if some one was rubbing my fingers with a hot iron. Nevertheless, there was no remarkable appearance ; neither swelling, nor pustule, nor inflammation. The pain rapidly spread along the arm, as far as the armpit.
Page 330 - In their most complete state they consist of two surfaces, one of which is even and imperforate, like the cortical layer...
Page 92 - Leschenault) slightly touched the first three fingers of my left hand : at the time I only perceived a slight pricking, to which I paid no attention. This was at seven in the morning. The pain continued to increase; in an hour it had become intolerable: it seemed as if some one was rubbing my fingers with a hot iron. Nevertheless there was no remarkable appearance ; neither swelling, nor pustule, nor inflammation. The pain rapidly spread along the arm as far as the armpit. I was then seized with...
Page 285 - The same excellent botanist adds, that it is said to impart an indelible stain to linen. P. Browne states, that its stalk is employed to bring sugar to a good grain when it is too viscid, and cannot be made to granulate properly by the application of lime alone ; Arum ovatum is used for the same purpose.
Page 247 - ... plantations in cultivated countries, and of forests where nature remains in temperate countries in a savage state. Their timber, in commerce, is known under the names of Deal, Fir, Pine, and Cedar, and is principally the wood of the Spruce, the Larch, the Scotch Fir, the Weymouth Pine, and...
Page 330 - Mucedo ; in some of these the joints disarticulate, and appear to be capable of reproduction ; in others sporules collect in the terminal joints, and are finally dispersed by the rupture of the cellule that contained them. In a higher state of composition, Fungi are masses of cellular tissue of a determinate figure, the whole centre of which consists of sporules either lying naked among filaments as in the Puff-balls, or contained in membranous tubes or sporidia, like the thecae of Lichens, as in...
Page 92 - I experienced a painful contraction of the back of the jaws, which made me fear an attack of tetanus. I then went to bed, hoping that repose would alleviate my suffering ; but it did not abate ; on the contrary it continued nearly the whole of the following night ; but I lost the contraction of the jaws about seven in the evening. The next morning the pain began to leave me, and I fell asleep. I continued to suffer for two days ; and the pain returned in full force when I put my hand into water....
Page 92 - About noon I experienced a painful contraction of the back of the jaws, which made me fear an attack of tetanus. I then went to bed, hoping that repose would alleviate my suffering; but it did not abate ; on the contrary, it continued...
Page 313 - Candolle and Brongniart, in referring it here. Delile has published an account of the germination of Isoetes setacea, from which it appears that its sporules sprout upwards and downwards, forming an intermediate solid body, which ultimately becomes the stem or cormus, but it is not stated whether the points from which the ascending and descending axes take their rise are uniform ; as no analogy in structure is discoverable between these sporules and seeds, it is probable that they are not. Delile...
Page 9 - It is administered in the West Indies as a substitute for ipecacuanha, and the juice of the- plant is considered by the native doctors of India as a valuable remedy in ophthalmia, either dropped in the eye or rubbed on the tarsus; it is also considered purgative and deobstruent. Ainslie, M. Med. Ind. 243 ; Prince Maximil. Travels, 214; Aublet, .Hist.

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