Poetics

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1895 - Literary Collections - 60 pages
185 Reviews
Aristotle's Politics is a key document in Western political thought. In these first two books Aristotle shows his complete mastery of political theory and practice, and raises many crucial issues still with us today. In Book I he argues vigorously for a political theory based on 'nature'. By nature, man is a 'political animal', one naturally fitted for life in a polis or state. Some people, however, are natural slaves; and women are by nature subordinate to men. Acquisition and exchange are natural, but not trading for profit. In Book II he launches a sharp attack on Plato's two 'utopias', the Republic and the Laws, and also criticizes three historical states reputed to be well governed: Sparta, Crete, and Carthage. This volume contains a close translation of these two books, together with a philosophical commentary. It is well suited to the requirements of readers who do not know Greek.
  

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Quite short but full of great advice. - Goodreads
The plot is the source and the soul of tragedy. - Goodreads
The best book on the mechanics of writing ever written. - Goodreads
But very dense and hard to read. - Goodreads
... a good reference. - Goodreads
A timeless classic every writer should own. - Goodreads

Review: Poetics

User Review  - Danny - Goodreads

Aristotle, Longinus, and Horace are all a bit vague to me. Perhaps this is due to my reading them in translation or because I have not read all of the texts to which they refer (many of which are no ... Read full review

Review: Poetics

User Review  - Mario - Goodreads

Quite short but full of great advice. A timeless classic every writer should own. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Chapter I
1
Chapter II
3
Chapter III
4
Chapter IV
5
Chapter V
9
Chapter VI
10
Chapter VII
14
Chapter VIII
16
Chapter XV
27
Chapter XVI
29
Chapter XVII
32
Chapter XVIII
34
Chapter XIX
36
Chapter XX
38
Chapter XXI
40
Chapter XXII
43

Chapter IX
17
Chapter X
19
Chapter XI
20
Chapter XII
21
Chapter XIII
22
Chapter XIV
24
Chapter XXIII
47
Chapter XXIV
49
Chapter XXV
53
Chapter XXVI
58
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About the author (1895)

Aristotle, 384 B.C. - 322 B. C. Aristotle was born at Stagira, in Macedonia, in 384 B.C. At the age of 17, he went to Athens to study at Plato's Academy, where he remained for about 20 years, as a student and then as a teacher. When Plato died in 347 B.C., Aristotle moved to Assos, a city in Asia Minor, where a friend of his, Hermias, was ruler. After Hermias was captured and executed by the Persians in 345 B.C., Aristotle went to Pella, the Macedonian capital, where he became the tutor of the king's young son Alexander, later known as Alexander the Great. In 335, when Alexander became king, Aristotle returned to Athens and established his own school, the Lyceum Aristotle's works were lost in the West after the decline of Rome, but during the 9th Century A.D., Arab scholars introduced Aristotle, in Arabic translation, to the Islamic world. In the 13th Century, the Latin West renewed its interest in Aristotle's work, and Saint Thomas Aquinas found in it a philosophical foundation for Christian thought. The influence of Aristotle's philosophy has been pervasive; it has even helped to shape modern language and common sense. Aristotle died in 322 B.C.

S. H. Butcher

Samuel Henry Butcher was born in Dublin to Samuel Butcher, Bishop of Meath. John Butcher, 1st Baron Danesfort was his younger brother. He became an eminent classical scholar and, in his final years, an English politician. He was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge between 1869 and 1873 where he was Senior Classic and Chancellor's medalist. Elected fellow of Trinity in 1874, he left the college on his marriage, in 1876, to the daughter of Archbishop Trench. From 1876 to 1882 he was a fellow of University College, Oxford, and from 1882 to 1903 he became Professor of Greek at Edinburgh University. He was President of the British Academy, 1909-1910.

Andrew Lang

Andrew Lang (31 March 1844 - 20 July 1912) was a Scots poet, novelist, literary critic, and contributor to the field of anthropology. He is best known as a collector of folk and fairy tales. The Andrew Lang lectures at the University of St Andrews are named after him.

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