The Second Oldest Profession: Spies and Spying in the Twentieth Century

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Penguin Books, 1987 - History - 436 pages
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The author examines the rich history of spying and its legends, from Wild Bill Donovan to Kim Philby and Mata Hari. He reveals the true, sometimes laughable exploits of these heroes and questions their effect on history. 16 pages of black-and-white photos.

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The second oldest profession: spies and spying in the twentieth century

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The first modern, permanent intelligence agency was created about 1909, and within a few years all the great powers had similar agencies. Concentrating almost entirely on Britain, France, Germany ... Read full review

Contents

Governments Spies and Fairy Tales
9
The Legends Crow
29
CnmhtheRedTenor
53
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Phillip Knightley was an award-winning investigative journalist with the Sunday Times for twenty years. He has written numerous books, including The Master Spy: The Story of Kim Philby, and a memoir, A Hack's Progress. He lives in London and travels widely to write and lecture.

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