Standard History of New Orleans, Louisiana: Giving a Description of the Natural Advantages, Natural History, Settlement, Indians, Creoles, Municipal and Military History, Mercantile and Commercial Interests, Banking, Transportation, Struggles Against High Water, the Press, Educational ... (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Henry Rightor
Lewis Publishing Company, 1900 - New Orleans (La.) - 743 pages
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Contents

I
7
II
39
III
57
IV
78
V
129
VI
171
VII
184
VIII
203
XIV
325
XV
361
XVI
389
XVII
394
XVIII
417
XIX
463
XX
480
XXI
511

IX
226
X
256
XI
267
XII
286
XIII
315
XXII
538
XXIII
578
XXIV
606
XXV
629
XXVI
646

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Page 36 - The inhabitants of the ceded territory shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States, and admitted as soon as possible, according to the principles of the Federal constitution, to the enjoyment of all the rights, advantages, and immunities, of citizens of the United States ; and, in the mean time, they shall be maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property, and the religion which they profess.
Page 158 - Orleans, in return for the most scrupulous non-interference and courtesy on our part, it is ordered that hereafter when any female shall, by word, gesture, or movement, insult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States, she shall be regarded and held liable to be treated as a woman of the town plying her avocation.
Page 666 - Cuba, of the provisions of the treaty of commercial reciprocity concluded between the United States and the Republic of Cuba on December 11, 1902, or...
Page 29 - The navigation of the river Mississippi from its source to the ocean, shall forever remain free and open to the subjects of Great Britain and the citizens of the United States.
Page 37 - States a strong proof of his friendship, doth hereby cede to the said United States, in the name of the French Republic, forever and in full sovereignty, the said territory, with all its rights and appurtenances, as fully and in the same manner as they have been acquired by the French Republic, in virtue of the above-mentioned treaty, concluded with His Catholic Majesty.
Page 36 - This accession of territory strengthens forever the power of the United States ; and I have just given to England a maritime rival that will sooner or later humble her pride.
Page 29 - ... to the middle of the river Apalachicola, or Catahouche ; thence along the middle thereof to its junction with the Flint river ; thence straight to the head of St. Mary's river ; and thence down along the middle of St. Mary's river to the Atlantic ocean.
Page 158 - As the officers and soldiers of the United States have been subject to repeated insults from the women (calling themselves ladies) of New Orleans, in return for the most scrupulous noninterference and courtesy on our part, it is ordered that hereafter when any female shall, by word, gesture, or movement, insult or show contempt for any officer or soldier of the United States, she shall be regarded and held liable to be treated as a woman of the...
Page 666 - All sugars above number twenty Dutch standard of color, two cents per pound. Molasses testing above fifty-six degrees, four cents per gallon. Sugar drainings and sugar sweepings shall be subject to duty either as molasses or sugar, as the case may be, according to polariscopic test.

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