A Personal Narrative of the Discovery of the North-west Passage: With Numerous Incidents of Travel and Adventure During Nearly Five Years' Continuous Service in the Arctic Regions While in Search of the Expedition Under Sir John Franklin (Google eBook)

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Hurst and Blackett, 1857 - . - 616 pages
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An amazing account, history in your hand

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Page 285 - The round or buttock of beef of the best quality, having been cut into thin steaks, from which the fat and membranous parts were pared away, was dried in a...
Page 77 - We deem it right to caution you against suffering the two vessels placed under your orders to separate, except in the event of accident or unavoidable necessity...
Page 410 - ) mentions another ingenious mode of capturing the bear by taking advantage of the well-known voracity of the animal, which generally swallows its food without much mastication. A thick and strong piece of whalebone, about four inches broad and two feet long, is rolled up into a small compass, and carefully enveloped in blubber, forming a round ball. It is then placed in the open air at a low temperature, where it soon becomes hard and frozen. The natives, armed with their knives, bows, and arrows,...
Page 478 - Cenomyce rangiferina"*—all low ground-growing species. The statements, however, of the latest observer on the subject, Dr Armstrongf, are somewhat different, both as regards the shedding of the horns and the migration of the deer. As to the first, he says, " The calving season, as far as my observation enables me to judge, is in June, prior to, and coeval with which the bucks shed their antlers, which appear to be again entirely reproduced in the latter end of August and early in September;" and...
Page 400 - On ascending these hills, fossilised charcoal is everywhere met with, covered apparently with ashes, but on closer examination, this ash is also found to be a petrifaction, and so hard that it can scarcely be scraped off with a knife. On the summit another curiosity is found, namely, a long row of beams, resembling the former, but fixed perpendicularly in the sandstone. The ends, which project from seven to ten inches, are for the greater part broken. The whole has the appearance of a ruinous dyke.
Page 409 - It is well known that within the tropics, the hibernation, or more properly aestivation, of animals is determined not by the temperature, but by the times of drought. Near Rio de Janeiro, I was at first surprised to observe, that, a few days after some little depressions had been filled with water, they were peopled by numerous full-grown shells and beetles, which must have been lying dormant. Humboldt has related the strange accident of a hovel...
Page 476 - September ;" and elsewhere he especially notices the rapidity of growth of the new horns. As regards the second part, he makes the following remarks ; and observations to the same effect occur in "Osborn's Voyage of the Investigator :" — " It has hitherto been the generally received opinion that these animals migrate to the southward, on the approach of winter, to lands •where the cold is less intense and the pasturage more abundant, an opinion formed from the writings of distinguished Polar...
Page 401 - In this bank, which i> exposed to the sea, beams or trunks of trees are found, generally in an horizontal position, but with great irregularity, fifty or more of them together,— the largest being about 10 inches in diameter.
Page 258 - ... in search of a large piece of ice, with a good depth of snow around it, under the shelter of which we might pass the night. We had given up hope of receiving any relief, or of being found by a searching party from the ship until the morning; and having fired our last charge of ammunition, our entire strength for attack or defence, if we met with bears, which we knew were prowling about, lay in boarding-pikes. We were then in search of our resting-place when, to the inexpressible delight of all,...
Page 313 - While here, as there was but little to be done in the way of sketching, I used generally to take my gun and was fortunate enough one day to bring home an ostrich, the only one indeed which as yet we had been able to kill, altho great numbers had been seen. It was a young one, and excellent eating.

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